Tag: US

Look who the Hawaii judge met with before ruling against Trump’s executive order!

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Well well well… Look who the Hawaii judge met with before ruling against Trump’s executive order!

Full article here:  http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=68118

President Trump’s revised travel ban was put on hold Wednesday by U.S. District Court Judge Derrick Watson in Hawaii just hours before it was set to take effect after hearing arguments that the executive order discriminates on the basis of nationality. According to reports, Watson met with President Obama the day before requesting a temporary restraining order on President Trump’s new executive order.

 

Department Of Justice Official Release On Yahoo Hack Charges

https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/us-charges-russian-fsb-officers-and-their-criminal-conspirators-hacking-yahoo-and-millions

Office of Public Affairs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

U.S. Charges Russian FSB Officers and Their Criminal Conspirators for Hacking Yahoo and Millions of Email Accounts

FSB Officers Protected, Directed, Facilitated and Paid Criminal Hackers

A grand jury in the Northern District of California has indicted four defendants, including two officers of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), for computer hacking, economic espionage and other criminal offenses in connection with a conspiracy, beginning in January 2014, to access Yahoo’s network and the contents of webmail accounts. The defendants are Dmitry Aleksandrovich Dokuchaev, 33, a Russian national and resident; Igor Anatolyevich Sushchin, 43, a Russian national and resident; Alexsey Alexseyevich Belan, aka “Magg,” 29, a Russian national and resident; and Karim Baratov, aka “Kay,” “Karim Taloverov” and “Karim Akehmet Tokbergenov,” 22, a Canadian and Kazakh national and a resident of Canada.

The defendants used unauthorized access to Yahoo’s systems to steal information from about at least 500 million Yahoo accounts and then used some of that stolen information to obtain unauthorized access to the contents of accounts at Yahoo, Google and other webmail providers, including accounts of Russian journalists, U.S. and Russian government officials and private-sector employees of financial, transportation and other companies. One of the defendants also exploited his access to Yahoo’s network for his personal financial gain, by searching Yahoo user communications for credit card and gift card account numbers, redirecting a subset of Yahoo search engine web traffic so he could make commissions and enabling the theft of the contacts of at least 30 million Yahoo accounts to facilitate a spam campaign.

The charges were announced by Attorney General Jeff Sessions of the U.S. Department of Justice, Director James Comey of the FBI, Acting Assistant Attorney General Mary McCord of the National Security Division, U.S. Attorney Brian Stretch for the Northern District of California and Executive Assistant Director Paul Abbate of the FBI’s Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch.

“Cyber crime poses a significant threat to our nation’s security and prosperity, and this is one of the largest data breaches in history,” said Attorney General Sessions. “But thanks to the tireless efforts of U.S. prosecutors and investigators, as well as our Canadian partners, today we have identified four individuals, including two Russian FSB officers, responsible for unauthorized access to millions of users’ accounts. The United States will vigorously investigate and prosecute the people behind such attacks to the fullest extent of the law.”

“Today we continue to pierce the veil of anonymity surrounding cyber crimes,” said Director Comey. “We are shrinking the world to ensure that cyber criminals think twice before targeting U.S. persons and interests.”

“ The criminal conduct at issue, carried out and otherwise facilitated by officers from an FSB unit that serves as the FBI’s point of contact in Moscow on cybercrime matters, is beyond the pale,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General McCord. “Once again, the Department and the FBI have demonstrated that hackers around the world can and will be exposed and held accountable. State actors may be using common criminals to access the data they want, but the indictment shows that our companies do not have to stand alone against this threat. We commend Yahoo and Google for their sustained and invaluable cooperation in the investigation aimed at obtaining justice for, and protecting the privacy of their users.”

“This is a highly complicated investigation of a very complex threat. It underscores the value of early, proactive engagement and cooperation between the private sector and the government,” said Executive Assistant Director Abbate. “The FBI will continue to work relentlessly with our private sector and international partners to identify those who conduct cyber-attacks against our citizens and our nation, expose them and hold them accountable under the law, no matter where they attempt to hide.”

“Silicon Valley’s computer infrastructure provides the means by which people around the world communicate with each other in their business and personal lives. The privacy and security of those communications must be governed by the rule of law, not by the whim of criminal hackers and those who employ them. People rightly expect that their communications through Silicon Valley internet providers will remain private, unless lawful authority provides otherwise. We will not tolerate unauthorized and illegal intrusions into the Silicon Valley computer infrastructure upon which both private citizens and the global economy rely,” said U.S. Attorney Stretch. “Working closely with Yahoo and Google, Department of Justice lawyers and the FBI were able to identify and expose the hackers responsible for the conduct described today, without unduly intruding into the privacy of the accounts that were stolen. We commend Yahoo and Google for providing exemplary cooperation while zealously protecting their users’ privacy.”

Summary of Allegations

According to the allegations of the Indictment:

The FSB officer defendants, Dmitry Dokuchaev and Igor Sushchin, protected, directed, facilitated and paid criminal hackers to collect information through computer intrusions in the U.S. and elsewhere. In the present case, they worked with co-defendants Alexsey Belan and Karim Baratov to obtain access to the email accounts of thousands of individuals.

Belan had been publicly indicted in September 2012 and June 2013 and was named one of FBI’s Cyber Most Wanted criminals in November 2013. An Interpol Red Notice seeking his immediate detention has been lodged (including with Russia) since July 26, 2013. Belan was arrested in a European country on a request from the U.S. in June 2013, but he was able to escape to Russia before he could be extradited.

Instead of acting on the U.S. government’s Red Notice and detaining Belan after his return, Dokuchaev and Sushchin subsequently used him to gain unauthorized access to Yahoo’s network. In or around November and December 2014, Belan stole a copy of at least a portion of Yahoo’s User Database (UDB), a Yahoo trade secret that contained, among other data, subscriber information including users’ names, recovery email accounts, phone numbers and certain information required to manually create, or “mint,” account authentication web browser “cookies” for more than 500 million Yahoo accounts.

Belan also obtained unauthorized access on behalf of the FSB conspirators to Yahoo’s Account Management Tool (AMT), which was a proprietary means by which Yahoo made and logged changes to user accounts. Belan, Dokuchaev and Sushchin then used the stolen UDB copy and AMT access to locate Yahoo email accounts of interest and to mint cookies for those accounts, enabling the co-conspirators to access at least 6,500 such accounts without authorization.

Some victim accounts were of predictable interest to the FSB, a foreign intelligence and law enforcement service, such as personal accounts belonging to Russian journalists; Russian and U.S. government officials; employees of a prominent Russian cybersecurity company; and numerous employees of other providers whose networks the conspirators sought to exploit. However, other personal accounts belonged to employees of commercial entities, such as a Russian investment banking firm, a French transportation company, U.S. financial services and private equity firms, a Swiss bitcoin wallet and banking firm and a U.S. airline.

 

During the conspiracy, the FSB officers facilitated Belan’s other criminal activities, by providing him with sensitive FSB law enforcement and intelligence information that would have helped him avoid detection by U.S. and other law enforcement agencies outside Russia, including information regarding FSB investigations of computer hacking and FSB techniques for identifying criminal hackers. Additionally, while working with his FSB conspirators to compromise Yahoo’s network and its users, Belan used his access to steal financial information such as gift card and credit card numbers from webmail accounts; to gain access to more than 30 million accounts whose contacts were then stolen to facilitate a spam campaign; and to earn commissions from fraudulently redirecting a subset of Yahoo’s search engine traffic.

 

When Dokuchaev and Sushchin learned that a target of interest had accounts at webmail providers other than Yahoo, including through information obtained as part of the Yahoo intrusion, they tasked their co-conspirator, Baratov, a resident of Canada, with obtaining unauthorized access to more than 80 accounts in exchange for commissions. On March 7, the Department of Justice submitted a provisional arrest warrant to Canadian law enforcement authorities, requesting Baratov’s arrest. On March 14, Baratov was arrested in Canada and the matter is now pending with the Canadian authorities.

 

An indictment is merely an accusation, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.

 

The FBI, led by the San Francisco Field Office, conducted the investigation that resulted in the charges announced today. The case is being prosecuted by the U.S. Department of Justice National Security Division’s Counterintelligence and Export Control Section and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California, with support from the Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs.

Defendants: At all times relevant to the charges, the Indictment alleges as follows:

    • Dmitry Aleksandrovich Dokuchaev, 33, was an officer in the FSB Center for Information Security, aka “Center 18.” Dokuchaev was a Russian national and resident.
    • Igor Anatolyevich Sushchin, 43, was an FSB officer, a superior to Dokuchaev within the FSB, and a Russian national and resident. Sushchin was embedded as a purported employee and Head of Information Security at a Russian investment bank.
    • Alexsey Alexseyevich Belan, aka “Magg,” 29, was born in Latvia and is a Russian national and resident. U.S. Federal grand juries have indicted Belan twice before, in 2012 and 2013, for computer fraud and abuse, access device fraud and aggravated identity theft involving three U.S.-based e-commerce companies and the FBI placed Belan on its “Cyber Most Wanted” list.  Belan is currently the subject of a pending “Red Notice” requesting that Interpol member nations (including Russia) arrest him pending extradition. Belan was also one of two criminal hackers named by President Barack Obama on Dec. 29, 2016, pursuant to Executive Order 13694, as a Specially Designated National subject to sanctions.
    • Karim Baratov, aka “Kay,” “Karim Taloverov” and “Karim Akehmet Tokbergenov,” 22. He is a Canadian and Kazakh national and a resident of Canada.

Victims: Yahoo; more than 500 million Yahoo accounts for which account information about was stolen by the defendants; more than 30 million Yahoo accounts for which account contents were accessed without authorization to facilitate a spam campaign; and at least 18 additional users at other webmail providers whose accounts were accessed without authorization.

 

Time Period: As alleged in the Indictment, the conspiracy began at least as early as 2014 and, even though the conspirators lost their access to Yahoo’s networks in September 2016, they continued to utilize information stolen from the intrusion up to and including at least December 2016.

 

Crimes:

Count(s) Defendant(s) Charge Statute                 18 U.S.C. Conduct Maximum Penalty
1 All Conspiring to commit computer fraud and abuse § 1030(b) Defendants conspired to hack into the computers of Yahoo and accounts maintained by Yahoo, Google and other providers to steal information from them.

 

First, Belan gained access to Yahoo’s servers and stole information that allowed him, Dokuchaev, and Sushchin to gain unauthorized access to individual Yahoo user accounts.

Then, Dokuchaev and Sushchin tasked Baratov with gaining access to individual user accounts at Google and other Providers (but not Yahoo) and paid Baratov for providing them with the account passwords. In some instances, Dokuchaev and Sushchin tasked Baratov with targeting accounts that they learned of through access to Yahoo’s UDB and AMT (e.g., Gmail accounts that served as a Yahoo user’s secondary account).

10 years
2 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Conspiring to engage in economic espionage § 1831(a)(5) Starting on Nov. 4, 2014, Belan stole, and the defendants thereafter transferred, received and possessed the following Yahoo trade secrets:

  • the Yahoo UDB, which was proprietary and confidential Yahoo technology and information, including subscriber names, secondary accounts, phone numbers, challenge questions and answers;
  • the AMT, Yahoo’s interface to the UDB; and
  • Yahoo’s cookie “minting” source code, which enabled the defendants to manufacture account cookies to then gain access to individual Yahoo user accounts.
15 years
3 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Conspiring to engage in theft of trade secrets § 1832(a)(5) See Count 2 10 years
4-6 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Economic espionage §§ 1831(a)(1), (a)(4), and 2 See Count 2 15 years (each count)
7-9 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Theft of trade secrets §§ 1832(a)(1), and 2 See Count 2 10 years (each count)
10 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Conspiring to commit wire fraud § 1349 The defendants fraudulently schemed to gain unauthorized access to Yahoo’s network through compromised Yahoo employee accounts and then used the Yahoo trade secrets to gain unauthorized access to valuable non-public information in individual Yahoo user accounts. 20 years
11-13 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Accessing (or attempting to access) a computer without authorization to obtain information for the purpose of commercial advantage and private financial gain. §§ 1030(a)(2)(C), 1030(c)(2)(B)(i)-(iii), and 2 The defendants gained unauthorized access to Yahoo’s corporate network and obtained information regarding Yahoo’s network architecture and the UDB. 5 years

(each count)

14-17 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Transmitting code with the intent to cause damage to computers. §§ 1030(a)(5)(A), 1030(c)(4)(B), and 2 During the course of their unauthorized access to Yahoo’s network, the defendants transmitted code on Yahoo’s network in order to maintain a persistent presence, to redirect Yahoo search engine users and to mint cookies for individual Yahoo accounts. 10 years (each count)
18-24 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Accessing (or attempting to access) a computer without authorization to obtain information for the purpose of commercial advantage and private financial gain. §§ 1030(a)(2)(C), 1030(c)(2)(B)(i)-(iii), and 2 Defendants obtained unauthorized access to individual Yahoo user accounts. 5 years

(each count)

25-36 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Counterfeit access device fraud §§ 1029(a)(1), 1029(b)(1), and 2 Defendants used minted cookies to gain unauthorized access to individual Yahoo user accounts. 10 years (each count)
37 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Belan

Counterfeit access device making equipment §§ 1029(a)(4) Defendants used software to mint cookies for unauthorized access to individual Yahoo user accounts. 15 years
38 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Baratov

Conspiring to commit access device fraud §§ 1029(b)(2) Defendants Dokuchaev and Sushchin tasked Baratov with gaining unauthorized access to individual user accounts at Google and other Providers and then paid Baratov for providing them with the account passwords. In some instances, Dokuchaev and Sushchin tasked Baratov with targeting accounts that they learned of through access to Yahoo’s UDB and AMT (e.g., Gmail accounts that served as a Yahoo user’s secondary account). 7 ½ years.
39 Dokuchaev

Sushchin

Baratov

Conspiring to commit wire fraud § 1349 See Count 38 20 years
40-47 Dokuchaev

Baratov

Aggravated identity theft § 1028A(a)(1) See Count 38 2 years

Dmitri Dokuchae et al Indictment Redacted

17-278

National Security Division (NSD)

USAO – California, Northern

Topic:

Counterintelligence and Export Control

Updated March 15,

https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/us-charges-russian-fsb-officers-and-their-criminal-conspirators-hacking-yahoo-and-millions

 

 

SEE ALSO:

https://www.wired.com/2017/03/yahoo-hack-russia-indictment/

 

Beware The Ides Of March

Is this the day financial chaos begins?

Spicer Explains “Wiretapping” Claims

Image result for trump wiretapped

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/spicer-says-trumps-wiretap-claim-wasnt-meant-to-be-literal-2017-03-13

White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Monday back-pedaled President Donald Trump’s claims that his phone line was ordered tapped by then-President Barack Obama, an allegation of illegality that Trump recently made on Twitter without providing any evidence.

In an animated question-and-answer session with reporters during his regular briefing, Spicer suggested Trump had been speaking broadly when he posted his accusations against Obama on March 4.

“He doesn’t really think that President Obama went up and tapped his phone personally,” Spicer said. “But I think there’s no question that the Obama administration — that there were actions about surveillance and other activities that occurred in the 2016 election. That is a widely reported activity that occurred back then. The president used the word ‘wiretapped’ in quotes to mean broadly surveillance and other activities during that — and that is again something.”

Spicer’s remarks on Monday were the first from the press secretary suggesting the president hadn’t meant his allegation as necessarily literal — and therefore wasn’t maintaining that he, and his own phone lines at Trump Tower in Manhattan, were targeted directly by the Obama administration.

An expanded version of this report appears on WSJ.com.

 

Actually, I think Spicer has a good point about the general use of the term “wiretapping”, especially in light of WikiLeaks Vault7 revelations and confirmations about the techniques available to the CIA for covert surveillance, making “wiretapping” in the literal sense rather archaic and redundant.

 

Spies Tell Lies, By Jon Rappoport

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Spies tell lies, spying is lying

Spies tell lies, spying is lying

Spying is lying, spies tell lies

by Jon Rappoport

March 9, 2017

In recent articles, I’ve highlighted items from the latest WikiLeaks data-dump of CIA files. For example:

The CIA’s use of other nations’ hacking tools, in order to give the impression that, when the CIA hacks into secret areas, it looks like other nations did the hacking.

All this is SOP for the CIA and intelligence agencies around the world.

Spies tell lies. A day without lying is a day without joy.

Spies play chess. “Well, when we leak THIS information to the press, they’ll emphasize the source of the leak (of course we know it’s a fake source we’ve chosen). But when we leak THAT information, the press will emphasize the content of the leak—which is what we want them to do in that case.”

Naïve people are shocked that the CIA could have fabricated the whole “Russia hacked the US election” story. But this is what the CIA does. This is another day at the office.

On the other hand, Russian intelligence could have hacked (influenced) the US election. And to put a further twist on it, Russia could have made that move, anticipating that US intelligence would discover it and go public with it. And then Russia would covertly launch a planned campaign to ridicule the CIA for claiming such an “absurdity.”

During the Cold War, several important KGB spies defected to the US. The CIA then proceeded to vet them, to find out whether they were genuine, or were sent here to seed the CIA with disinformation. As you can imagine, the whole business developed severe problems.

For example: “All right, yes, the KGB sent me to America to confuse you. But now I’m telling you the truth. I’m giving you actual secrets. And I want to stay here. I don’t want to go home. If I go home, the KGB will vet me to see whether I actually gave you real secrets…”

CIA: “Maybe we can triple this Russian. He’s now on our side, we think. So we send him back, claiming we couldn’t get anything useful out of him. But now he’s ours. So we give him a bunch of lies to tell his bosses about us, the CIA…”

In the end, nobody on either side knows what’s going on. But they play the game anyway.

The CIA is a reality-creator and a reality-destroyer. They pick and choose what to do in each situation. But it would be folly to imagine Agency people always do brilliant work. They mis-estimate blowback. They fail to handle blowback. They try to pick an outside scapegoat on whom to blame the blowback. They try to limit the blowback by defaming, discrediting, blackmailing, or killing people.

They rewrite history. They change sequences of events. They invent events that never happened. They blame people who don’t even exist. They present themselves as bumblers, to hide their more intelligent operations. They hold forums designed to show their work as superficial information-gathering, as if they were little more than a think-tank. They pretend to cooperate with Congress, while they spy on Congress.

Meanwhile, the press pretends to hold an innocent and respectful view of the CIA, dutifully reporting every piece of information that comes their way from the Agency. “Today, the CIA disclosed…” Disclosed? Or fabricated?

The CIA is perhaps the biggest fake news operation in the world. It exhales fake news as matter of course.

So naturally, it attracts men and women who have a bias in favor of fabricating. “Do you dream about lying with impunity? Contact our personnel office for employment opportunities.”

If a lie serves a greater truth, release the lie. If a truth serves a greater lie, tell the truth.

The old dictum, “garbage in, garbage out,” doesn’t apply to the Agency. The CIA is the Garbage Man for the known universe.

It’s rather astonishing, at this late date, that more people don’t get the con.

The CIA is a hustler operating a shell-game on a streetcorner. Except, lo and behold, all sorts of rubes are trying to jostle their way forward, to pay homage. And the cops are never going to show up to sweep the hustler away. The hustler is the cops.

“I was born to lie. But I always tell the truth. Trust me.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

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Pilger Message To Trump

AS ALWAYS, PILGER IS WORTH YOUR TIME. ENJOY:

 

Spicer Press Conference Video

“They Dropped Bombs On Us!”

Almost half a century after United States B-52 bombers dropped more than 500,000 tonnes of explosives on Cambodia’s countryside Washington wants the country to repay a $US500 million ($662 million) war debt.

The demand has prompted expressions of indignation and outrage from Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh.

US Air Force B-52 dropping bombs over Southeast Asia in the 1960s.© Public Domain US Air Force B-52 dropping bombs over Southeast Asia in the 1960s.

Over 200 nights in 1973 alone, 257,456 tons of explosives fell in secret carpet-bombing sweeps – half as many as were dropped on Japan during the Second World War.

The pilots flew at such great heights they were incapable of discriminating between a Cambodian village and their targets, North Vietnamese supply lines – nicknamed the “Ho Chi Minh Trail.”

The bombs were of such massive tonnage they blew out eardrums of anyone standing within a 1-kiolmetre radius.

Opposed: Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen in Phnom Penh.© AP Opposed: Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen in Phnom Penh.

War correspondent James Pringle was two kilometres away from a B-52 strike near Cambodia’s border.

“It felt like the world was coming to an end,” he recalls.

A string of bombs dropped by a US plane exploding across fields in Southeast Asia.© Supplied A string of bombs dropped by a US plane exploding across fields in Southeast Asia.

According to one genocide researcher, up to 500,000 Cambodians were killed, many of them children.

The bombings drove hundreds of thousands of ordinary Cambodians into the arms of the Khmer Rouge, an ultra-Marxist organisation which seized power in 1975 and over the next four years presided over the deaths of more than almost two million people through starvation disease and execution.

The debt started out as a US$274 million loan mostly for food supplies to the then US-backed Lon Nol government but has almost doubled over the years as Cambodia refused to enter into a re-payment program.

William Heidt, the US’s ambassador in Phnom Penh, said Cambodia’s failure to pay back the debt puts it in league with Sudan, Somalia and Zimbabwe.

“To me, Cambodia does not look like a country that should be in arrears…buildings coming up all over the city, foreign investment coming in, government revenue is rapidly rising,” Mr Heidt was quoted as saying by the Cambodia Daily.

“I’m saying it is in Cambodia’s interest not to look to the past, but to look at how to solve this because it’s important to Cambodia’s future,” he said, adding that the US has never seriously considered cancelling the debt.

Cambodia’s strongman prime minister Hen Sen, a former Khmer Rouge commander who defected to Vietnam, hit back, saying “The US created problems in my country and is demanding money from me.”

“They dropped bombs on our heads and then ask up to repay. When we do not repay, they tell the IMF (International Monetary Fund) not to lend us money,” he told an international conference in early March.

“We should raise our voices to talk about the issue of the country that has invaded other (countries) and has killed children.”

Mr Pringle, a former Reuters bureau chief in Ho Chi Minh City, said no-one could call him a supporter of Hun Sen, who has ruled Cambodia with an iron-fist for three decades.

But he said on this matter he is “absolutely correct.”

“Cambodia does not owe a brass farthing to the US for help in destroying its people, its wild animals, its rice fields and forest cover,” he wrote in the Cambodia Daily.

American Elizabeth Becker, one of the few correspondents who witnessed the Khmer Rouge’s genocide, has also written that the US “owes Cambodia more in war debts that can be repaid in cash.”

Mr Hun Sen pointed out that craters still dot the Cambodian countryside and villagers are still unearthing bombs, forcing mass evacuations until they can be deactivated.

“There are a lot of grenades and bombs left. That’s why so often Cambodian children are killed, because they don’t know that they are unexploded ordnance,” he said.

“And who did it? It’s America’s bombs and grenades.”

http://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/world/fury-in-cambodia-as-us-asks-to-be-paid-back-hundreds-of-millions-in-war-debts/ar-AAo7Pns?li=BBqdg4K&ocid=SK2MDHP