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Category: MELTDOWN NEWS

Fukushima Plant Owner To Dump 777,000 Tons Of Nuclear Waste Into Pacific Ocean

Fukushima waste dump

By: theantimedia.org |
Japan — More than three-quarters of a million tons of radioactive water is about to be dumped into the Pacific Ocean if the chairmen of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) have their way, Japanese media reported over the weekend. All they require now is final government approval.
“The decision has already been made,” TEPCO chairman Takashi Kawamura told the media, according to the Japan Times.
As of July 6, about 777,000 tons of tritium-tainted water is being stored in about 580 tanks at the Fukushima nuclear plant. The water, which is constantly injected into leaking reactor No. 1 to cool it since it was damaged by a tsunami in 2011, is then filtered to remove radioactive materials. The complex filtering system can eliminate everything but tritium.

This has left the Japanese government with a problem. They can’t go on filling up tanks forever. Something has to be done with the radioactive water. A government panel is currently coming to a decision on the issue, and simply dumping the water into the sea is an option on the table.
TEPCO chairman Kawamura is just waiting on the green light. “We cannot keep going if we do not have the support of the state,” he told the media.
Kawamura certainly has the support of NRA chairman Shunichi Tanaka, who’s been urging the TEPCO boss to make the move. Tanaka has been critical of Kawamura in the past, saying he should be more proactive in his handling of the Fukushima nuclear crisis.
“An operator lacking the will to take the initiative does not have the right to resume operation of nuclear reactors,” he said recently at a special meeting with TEPCO’s top management.
According to the Japan Times, Kawamura “feels emboldened to have the support of the NRA chairman.”
Tritium itself is said to be relatively harmless, and discharge of tritium-tainted water into the ocean is standard operating procedure at nuclear power plants. Oceanographer Simon Boxall spoke to The Guardian on the tritium issue last year, saying:
“In the broad scale of things, if they do end up putting the material in the Pacific, it will have minimal effect on an ocean basin scale.”
But local fishermen say the actual harmfulness of tritium isn’t the issue. What’s paramount is the perception people will have when they hear of hundreds of thousands of tons of radioactive water being released into the ocean. In short, such a move would make customers question the safety of their catches, which would thereby affect their livelihoods.
“Releasing (tritium) into the sea will create a new wave of unfounded rumors, making our efforts all for naught,” Kanji Tachiya, who heads a fishermen cooperative, told the Japan Times.
And Aileen Mioko-Smith of Green Action Japan says there is even more to consider here. “They say that it will be safe because the ocean is large so it will be diluted,” she told The Telegraph, “but that sets a precedent that can be copied, essentially permitting anyone to dump nuclear waste into our seas.”
Furthermore, says Mioko-Smith, those in charge of managing the Fukushima nuclear crisis have had plenty of time to come up with solutions and that the “out of sight, out of mind” approach is unacceptable:
“This accident happened more than six years ago and the authorities should have been able to devise a way to remove the tritium instead of simply announcing that they are going to dump it into the ocean.”

Contributed by The Anti-Media of theantimedia.org.

Donald Trump mocks Kim Jong-un as North Korea fires ballistic missile ahead of G20 summit

Trump mocks Kim

Donald Trump has mocked Kim Jong-un after North Korea has launched a ballistic missile into the sea off its east coast ahead of the G20 summit later this week.

The missile was launched at around 9.10am local time from an airfield in Panghyon, about 100 km (60 miles) northwest of the North’s capital, Pyongyang, the South Korean military said.

The rocket flew for about 40 minutes and may have landed in Japan’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), the Japanese government said.

The US President was quick to react on Twitter, asking “does this guy have anything better to do with his life?”

The launch is the last since Pyongyang fired several cruise missiles in early June.

It comes as the leaders of the United States, China, Japan and South Korea are expected to discuss efforts to rein in the North’s nuclear and missile tests the G20 summit on July 7 to 8.

Pyongyang has been working to develop a nuclear-tipped missile capable of hitting the United States.

Earlier this week, North Korea was a key topic in phone calls between President Donald Trump and the leaders of China and Japan.

Leaders of both Asian countries reaffirmed their commitment to a denuclearised Korean Peninsula.

Tuesday’s missile launch also comes ahead of July 4 Independence Day celebrations in the United States.

North Korea has previously fired missiles around this US holiday.

South Korea’s presidential Blue House said President Moon Jae-in called a national security council meeting for 2.30am GMT after being informed of the North’s missile launch.

Last week after his first summit with Moon, Trump called for a determined response to North Korea, stressing the importance of the alliance between the two countries.

Last month, North Korea carried out another test of a rocket engine, believed to be part of its programme to develop an intercontinental ballistic missile.

The US fears the test, the latest in a series of engine and missile tests this year, could be for the smallest stage of an ICBM rocket engine, an official said.

It is not known what type of rocket component was tested or whether it fit into the ICBM programme, another official told Reuters.

The test came days after the death of US student Otto Warmbier .

The 22-year-old died on Monday after suffering a severe brain injury while being held prisoner in North Korea.

The disclosure of the engine test also came a day after the US pressed China to exert more economic and diplomatic pressure on North Korea to help rein in its nuclear and missile programmes during a round of high-level talks in Washington.

Donald Trump has warned that a “major, major conflict” with North Korea is possible over its weapons programmes, although officials say tougher sanctions, not military force, are the preferred option.

The head of the US Defense Intelligence Agency told Congress last month that North Korea, if left unchecked, was on an “inevitable” path to obtaining a nuclear-armed missile capable of striking the US mainland.

Still, experts say Pyongyang could still be years away from have a reliable ICBM capability.

The continental United States is around 5,600 miles (9,000 km) from North Korea.

ICBMs have a minimum range of about 3,400 miles (5,500 km), but some are designed to travel 6,200 miles (10,000 km) or further.

Any military solution to the North Korea crisis would be “tragic on an unbelievable scale”, Trump’s defence secretary, Jim Mattis, said last month.

The US, meanwhile, is ramping up capabilities to defend against the threat from North Korea, staging its first-ever successful test to intercept an incoming ICBM-type missile in May.

But a test on June 21 of a new capability being developed by the United States and Japan to defend against shorter-range missiles failed to hit its target, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency said on Thursday.

It was the second such test of the SM-3 Block IIA interceptor, which is being developed by Raytheon. The previous intercept test, conducted in February, had been successful.

Natalie Evans

Unprecedented – 30 wildfires/9 states – “Turning livestock loose to run from wildfires”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrQoX03uYeY

Published on Jun 29, 2017
June 29, 2017: **Millions of acres are at risk it is so incredibly dry**
Nationally, 30 large fires have burned nearly 180,000 acres. Twenty new large fires were reported in nine states. More than 8,000 firefighters and support personnel are assigned to wildfires across the country. Firefighters contained 11 wildfires yesterday.

“It’s A Dry Heat”: Arizona Meltdown

Tyler Durden's picture
Ask any Arizonan whether their summers are more tolerable because “it’s a dry heat” and you’re likely to be asked to turn your oven to 150 degrees, stick your head inside for 20 minutes and report back as to whether or not the humidity within the oven ever crossed you mind.  Probably not.

And

And while the heatwave may not be that fun for the people living through it, it does making for some amazing pictures of stuff melting.

Perhaps that plastic mailbox post wasn’t such a great idea in retrospect.

 

On the bright side, you can get all your baking done outside in mother nature’s free oven.

“arizona isn’t that hot”— antonihoe (@confuzzledteen3) June 23, 2017

Plastic fences…also not a great idea.  Come on Arizona…you’re better than this.

 

Meanwhile, this Tempe resident (undoubtedly an ASU student judging by all the cheap alcoholic beverages) was just trying to do his part to fight climate change by recycling his beer bottles…it seems that ManBearPig won this round. 


Meanwhile, even the road signs are melting down…

 

…which is going to make it even harder for this guy to get around town…

 

Al Gore is going to have a field day with these pics

London tower blocks evacuated as 34 buildings fail fire tests

London Block Evacuation

By Kate Holton and Jamillah Knowles | LONDON

LONDON Britain said 34 high-rise apartment blocks had failed fire safety checks carried out after the deadly Grenfell Tower blaze, including several in north London where residents were forced to evacuate amid chaotic scenes.

British officials have conducted tests on some 600 high-rise buildings across England after fire ravaged the Grenfell social tower block in west London on June 14, killing at least 79 people in the capital’s most deadly blaze since World War Two.

The Department for Communities said 34 apartment blocks had failed tests in 17 parts of the country, from London in the southeast to Manchester in the north and Plymouth on the southwest coast.

Prime Minister Theresa May, who was forced to apologize for the government’s initial slow response to the tragedy, said the authorities were now racing to establish what needed to be done.

“In some cases it’s possible to take mitigating action,” she told Sky news. “In others it’s been necessary for people to move out on a temporary basis and that is what happened in Camden last night.”

Some 4,000 residents of the Chalcots Estate in Camden, north London, were told to vacate their apartments on Friday after the Fire Brigade ruled that their blocks were unsafe.

Emerging into the streets on a hot night, residents clutched children, pets and small amounts of clothing and food to try to find a bed in a local hotel or with family or friends. Many were directed to inflatable beds laid out on the floor of the local sports hall.

“I know it’s difficult but Grenfell changes everything,” Georgia Gould, Leader of Camden Council, said in a statement. “I don’t believe we can take any risks with our residents’ safety.”

May said the local authority would be given all the means necessary to make sure people had somewhere to stay.

Residents complained of first hearing about the evacuation from the media and getting very short notice to leave from city officials going door-to-door. Not all residents agreed to go, as they felt the evacuation was an over-reaction.

PUBLIC ANGER

“It was farcical communication,” 21-year-old Daniel Tackaberry told Reuters outside a nearby sports center where the local council had laid out air beds. “You don’t get everyone to leave this quickly.”

Several local councils said they were removing cladding from the facades of buildings that had failed the tests. In Camden, however, the London Fire Brigade found a number of faults, including concern about cladding, faulty fire doors and holes in compartment walls that could help a fire to spread.

Gould, the Camden council’s leader, said it would take up to four weeks to repair the blocks that were evacuated.

Communities Secretary Sajid Javid said the government was working with local authorities and fire services to address any problems that had been found.

“We are now rapidly identifying buildings of concern: samples are being tested very quickly; fire inspectors are checking the safety of the buildings as a whole; and we have issued interim safety guidance,” he said.

Police investigating the cause of the 24-story Grenfell Tower blaze have said the fire started in a fridge but spread rapidly due to external cladding on the building, trapping residents in their beds as they slept.

The cladding has since failed all safety checks and prompted a nationwide review of the materials used on everything from hospitals to hotels and apartment blocks.

The fire has become a flashpoint for public anger at the record of May’s Conservative Party in government following cuts to local authority budgets designed to lower the national deficit. Grenfell Tower is located in Kensington, one of the richest boroughs in Europe.

Battling to save her position after losing her majority in a June 8 election, May has promised to do everything she can to protect those residents who survived the fire and to improve the quality and safety of public housing in Britain.

British police have said they are considering bringing manslaughter charges over the Grenfell fire.

(Reporting by Kate Holton; Editing by Mark Heinrich and John Stonestreet

Source:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-fire-idUSKBN19F071

I’m waiting with baited breath to see what the next move is. Can’t help but think of the alleged FEMA camps in the States. Is this how the agenda plays out? Or is my conspiracist brain overthinking things? I realise those buildings need to made safe to live in, but I can’t help seeing the New World Order lurching forwards…

See also:

https://uncensored.co.nz/2017/06/24/34146/

South Korea set to abandon nuclear power programme

South Korea Nuclear Power

19 June 2017 | By GCR Staff

South Korea, one of the world’s leading civil nuclear powers, is to abandon plans to build any new reactors or extend the life of existing units. The announcement was made today by newly installed president Moon Jae-in.

Moon made the announcement at a ceremony to decommission the Kori-1 nuclear reactor at Busan, the country’s first and oldest nuclear power plant. He said his government would adopt policies for a “post-nuclear era”.

He said: “The shutdown of Kori 1 is the beginning of a nuclear energy-free country, a paradigm shift for a safer Korea.

“Korea’s energy policy used to pursue low cost and efficiency, while people’s lives, safety and environmental sustainability used to be treated lightly. But now it is the general idea that people’s lives and safety should be prioritised.”

Korea presently operates 25 reactors, including Kori-1, and these provide 23GW of energy, or about a third of the country’s electricity demand. Plans were in hand to increase this to 38GW by 2029, and the previous regime was seeking to renegotiate a treaty with the US to allow it to operate a full nuclear fuel cycle.

Korea has also been a player in the growing market for nuclear power stations in countries with no indigenous nuclear industry. The largest was a $20bn deal to build four nuclear reactors in the UAE.

Kepco, Korea’s state power utility, was considering an investment in the UK’s stalled Moorside nuclear project, presently owned by stricken Japanese engineer Toshiba. It was also in the running to build the first small modular reactor.

Moon, who campaigned on an anti-nuclear policy, said another reactor, whose lifespan was extended by 10 years to 2022, would be decommissioned as soon as possible.

The president had already ordered eight of the country’s coal power plants to cease production soon after taking office on 10 May, following the impeachment of his predecessor, Park Geun-hye.

South Korea is wrestling with air pollution problems that cost the country about $9bn a year, including carcinogenic fine dust particles. The country has 59 coal plants supplying almost 40% of the country’s electricity.

President Moon has said he wants to increase the portion of renewable energy to 20% by 2030 and increase LNG imports, possibly through a Russian pipeline passing through North Korean territory.

Image: The Kori plant at Busan has four reactors. Number 1 is on the right (Kori NPP)

https://www.globalconstructionreview.com/companies/south-korea-set-abandon-nu7clear-pow7er-program7me/

While I see this as essentially a good thing, did anyone notice the UN Agenda 2030 plan lurking in the shadows?

Russia Warns U.S. After Downing of Syrian Warplane

Syria Russia

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/18/world/middleeast/iran-syria-missile-launch-islamic-state.html?ribbon-ad-idx=5&rref=world/middleeast&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Middle%20East&pgtype=article

“WASHINGTON — An American fighter jet shot down a Syrian warplane on Sunday after it dropped bombs near local ground forces supported by the United States, the first time the American military has downed a Syrian aircraft since the start of the civil war in 2011, officials said.

The confrontation represents a further escalation between forces supporting President Bashar al-Assad of Syria and the United States, which has been directing the military campaign in Syria and Iraq against the Islamic State.

The American F/A-18 shot down the Syrian government warplane south of the town of Tabqah, on the same day that Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corps launched several midrange missiles from inside Iran at targets in Syria, hoping to punish Islamic State forces responsible for last week’s terrorist attacks in Tehran.

The Guards Corp said it “targeted the headquarters and meeting place and suicide car assembly line” of “ISIS terrorists” in the province of Deir al-Zour, where Islamic State forces surround an estimated 200,000 people in a government-held section of the provincial capital of the same name…..”

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/russia-shoot-down-all-flying-objects-in-syria-us-regime-warplane-isis-terror-a7797101.html

Credit Vadim Savitsky/Russian Defence, via European Pressphoto Agency

WASHINGTON — Long-running tensions between the United States and Russia erupted publicly on Monday as Moscow condemned the American military’s downing of a Syrian warplane and threatened to target aircraft flown by the United States and its allies west of the Euphrates.

The Russians also said they had suspended their use of a hotline that the American and Russian militaries used to avoid collisions of their aircraft in Syrian airspace.

The episode was the first time the United States downed a Syrian plane since the civil war began there in 2011 and came after the SU-22 jet dropped bombs on Sunday near American-backed fighters combating the Islamic State. It followed another major American military action against the Syrian government: a cruise missile strike to punish a nerve gas attack that killed civilians in April.

The latest escalation comes as competing forces converge on ungoverned swaths of Syria amid the country’s six-year civil war. Syrian forces and Iranian-backed militias that support them are extending their reach east closer to American-backed fighters, including forces that the Pentagon hopes will pursue the militants into the Euphrates River valley after they take the Islamic State’s self-declared capital of Raqqa. The collision of the disparate forces has, in effect, created a war within a war.

More:

“I would be very surprised if they willfully shot down a U.S. plane that came to bomb some al Qaeda target west of the Euphrates River,” said Michael O’Hanlon, a senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution, a think-tank in Washington. “On the other hand, if we’re coming after Assad’s forces with some big armada, maybe they want us to be a little nervous that maybe we’d get shot at.”

O’Hanlon added, “They’re trying to create some deterrents, or some limits, on our involvement in escalation. And it’s consistent with the way this thing has been going back and forth for a while.”

Then again, some analysts believe the Russians are issuing empty threats because they can’t afford the consequences of doing anything more.

“A lot of of this is saber rattling and bluster from the Russians who are clearly unnerved actually by recent U.S. actions,” said Gardiner.

Gardiner said it’s significant that when a plane from NATO-member Turkey shot down a Russian fighter operating from Syria in 2015 there was rhetoric from Moscow but not a whole lot of action……

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/20/russian-threat-to-target-us-aircraft-in-syria-seen-as-more-bluster.html

Sabre-rattling, or serious threat? Maybe there wasn’t a lot of action in 2015, but things have moved on. I guess we’ll find out what the next move is soon enough.

Tsunami hits Greenland after 4.0 earthquake, reportedly killing four

 http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/93817543/tsunami-hits-greenland-after-40-earthquake-reportedly-killing-four

Four people are missing and reportedly feared dead after the tsunami.

GOOGLE

Four people are reportedly feared dead in Greenland after an earthquake off the Arctic island’s west coast triggered a tsunami that flooded a village.

The Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland said that an earthquake late on Saturday (local time) with a magnitude of around 4.0 on the Richter scale struck northwestern Greenland near the village of Nuugaatsiaq.

79.483.914.5100

It said surging water is reported to have destroyed 11 buildings there.

Greenland public broadcaster KNR said police have evacuated 40 people from Nuugaatsiaq. In addition to those missing, it said nine people were injured, two seriously.

Experts said the quake likely triggered a landslide into the sea, resulting in the tsunami and flooding. That’s not a rare occurrence on the Arctic island that is an autonomous constituent country within Denmark.

19-JUN-2017 02:19:3379.483.914.5100GREENLAND SEA