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Cometary Impact 10,950 BC: The Alternative Archaeologists Were Right!

Looks like alternative archeaoligists like Graham Hancock, Velikovsky, DS Allen & JB Delair, David Hatcher Childress etc, can feel vindicated.

Wait for the backlash, or for some institution to claim the glory for themselves.

The Telegraph

Ancient stone carvings confirm how comet struck Earth in 10,950BC, sparking the rise of civilisations

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/04/21/ancient-stone-carvings-confirm-comet-struck-earth-10950bc-wiping/

 

Ancient stone carvings confirm that a comet struck the Earth around 11,000BC, a devastating event which wiped out woolly mammoths and sparked the rise of civilisations.

Experts at the University of Edinburgh analysed mysterious symbols carved onto stone pillars at Gobekli Tepe in southern Turkey, to find out if they could be linked to constellations.

The markings suggest that a swarm of comet fragments hit Earth at the exact same time that a mini-ice age struck, changing the entire course of human history.

Scientists have speculated for decades that a comet could be behind the sudden fall in temperature during a period known as the Younger Dryas. But recently the theory appeared to have been debunked by new dating of meteor craters in North America where the comet is thought to have struck.

However, when engineers studied animal carvings made on a pillar – known as the vulture stone – at Gobekli Tepe they discovered that the creatures were actually astronomical symbols which represented constellations and the comet.

The idea had been originally put forward by author Graham Hancock in his book Magicians of the Gods.

The Vulture Stone, at Gobekli Tepe
The Vulture Stone, at Gobekli Tepe Credit: Alistair Coombs

Using a computer programme to show where the constellations would have appeared above Turkey thousands of years ago, they were able to pinpoint the comet strike to 10,950BC, the exact time the Younger Dryas begins according to ice core data from Greenland.

The Younger Dryas is viewed as a crucial period for humanity, as it roughly coincides with the emergence of agriculture and the first Neolithic civilisations.

Before the strike, vast areas of wild wheat and barley had allowed nomadic hunters in the Middle East to establish permanent base camps. But the difficult climate conditions following the impact forced communities to come together and work out new ways of maintaining the crops, through watering and selective breeding. Thus farming began, allowing the rise of the first towns.

Edinburgh researchers said the carvings appear to have remained important to the people of Gobekli Tepe for millennia, suggesting that the event and cold climate that followed likely had a very serious impact.

 

Position of the sun and stars on the summer solstice of 10,950BC
Position of the sun and stars on the summer solstice of 10,950BC Credit:  Martin Sweatman and Stellarium

Dr Martin Sweatman, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Engineering, who led the research, said: “I think this research, along with the recent finding of a widespread platinum anomaly across the North American continent virtually seal the case in favour of (a Younger Dryas comet impact).

“Our work serves to reinforce that physical evidence. What is happening here is the process of paradigm change.

“It appears Göbekli Tepe was, among other things, an observatory for monitoring the night sky.

“One of its pillars seems to have served as a memorial to this devastating event – probably the worst day in history since the end of the ice age.”

Gobekli Tepe, is thought to be the world’s oldest temple site, which dates from around 9,000BC, predating Stonehenge by around 6,000 years.

Researchers believe the images were intended as a record of the cataclysmic event, and that a further carving showing a headless man may indicate human disaster and extensive loss of life. 

Symbolism on the pillars also indicates that the long-term changes in Earth’s rotational axis was recorded at this time using an early form of writing, and that Gobekli Tepe was an observatory for meteors and comets.

The finding also supports a theory that Earth is likely to experience periods when comet strikes are more likely, owing to the planet’s orbit intersecting orbiting rings of comet fragments in space.

But despite the ancient age of the pillars, Dr Sweatman does not believe it is the earliest example of astronomy in the archaeological record.

“Many paleolithic cave paintings and artefacts with similar animal symbols and other repeated symbols suggest astronomy could be very ancient indeed,” he said.

“If you consider that, according to astronomers, this giant comet probably arrived in the inner solar system some 20 to 30 thousand years ago, and it would have been a very visible and dominant feature of the night sky, it is hard to see how ancient people could have ignored this given the likely consequences.”

The research is published in Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry.

Water From Thin Air? New Device Can Pull Water From Desert Air

This new solar-powered device can pull water straight from the desert air

You can’t squeeze blood from a stone, but wringing water from the desert sky is now possible, thanks to a new spongelike device that uses sunlight to suck water vapor from air, even in low humidity. The device can produce nearly 3 liters of water per day for every kilogram of spongelike absorber it contains, and researchers say future versions will be even better. That means homes in the driest parts of the world could soon have a solar-powered appliance capable of delivering all the water they need, offering relief to billions of people.

The new water harvester is made of metal organic framework crystals pressed into a thin sheet of copper metal and placed between a solar absorber (above) and a condenser plate (below).

Wang Laboratory at MIT

There are an estimated 13 trillion liters of water floating in the atmosphere at any one time, equivalent to 10% of all of the freshwater in our planet’s lakes and rivers. Over the years, researchers have developed ways to grab a few trickles, such as using fine nets to wick water from fog banks, or power-hungry dehumidifiers to condense it out of the air. But both approaches require either very humid air or far too much electricity to be broadly useful.

To find an all-purpose solution, researchers led by Omar Yaghi, a chemist at the University of California, Berkeley, turned to a family of crystalline powders called metal organic frameworks, or MOFs. Yaghi developed the first MOFs—porous crystals that form continuous 3D networks—more than 20 years ago. The networks assemble in a Tinkertoy-like fashion from metal atoms that act as the hubs and sticklike organic compounds that link the hubs together. By choosing different metals and organics, chemists can dial in the properties of each MOF, controlling what gases bind to them, and how strongly they hold on.

Source: Sciencemag.

 

Isn’t This Already Happening? Geoengineering Experiment Announced.

US scientists are set to send aerosol injections 20km up into the earth’s stratosphere in the world’s biggest solar geoengineering programme to date, to study the potential of a future tech-fix for global warming.

The $20m (£16m) Harvard University project will launch within weeks and aims to establish whether the technology can safely simulate the atmospheric cooling effects of a volcanic eruption, if a last ditch bid to halt climate change is one day needed.

Scientists hope to complete two small-scale dispersals of first water and then calcium carbonate particles by 2022. Future tests could involve seeding the sky with aluminium oxide – or even diamonds.

“This is not the first or the only university study,” said Gernot Wagner, the project’s co-founder, “but it is most certainly the largest, and the most comprehensive.”

Janos Pasztor, Ban Ki-moon’s assistant climate chief at the UN who now leads a geoengineering governance initiative, said that the Harvard scientists would only disperse minimal amounts of compounds in their tests, under strict university controls.

“The real issue here is something much more challenging,” he said “What does moving experimentation from the lab into the atmosphere mean for the overall path towards eventual deployment?”

Geoengineering advocates stress that any attempt at a solar tech fix is years away and should be viewed as a compliment to – not a substitute for – aggressive emissions reductions action.

But the Harvard team, in a promotional video for the project, suggest a redirection of one percent of current climate mitigation funds to geoengineering research, and argue that the planet could be covered with a solar shield for as little as $10bn a year.

Some senior UN climate scientists view such developments with alarm, fearing a cash drain from proven mitigation technologies such as wind and solar energy, to ones carrying the potential for unintended disasters.

Kevin Trenberth, a lead author for the UN’s intergovernmental panel on climate change, said that despair at sluggish climate action, and the rise of Donald Trump were feeding the current tech trend.

“But solar geoengineering is not the answer,” he said. “Cutting incoming solar radiation affects the weather and hydrological cycle. It promotes drought. It destabilizes things and could cause wars. The side effects are many and our models are just not good enough to predict the outcomes”

Natural alterations to the earth’s radiation balance can be short-lasting, but terrifying. A 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption lowered global temperatures by 0.5C, while the Mount Tambora eruption in 1815 triggered Europe’s ‘year without a summer’, bringing crop failure, famine and disease.

A Met Office study in 2013 said that the dispersal of fine particles in the stratosphere could precipitate a calamitous drought across North Africa.

Frank Keutsch, the Harvard atmospheric sciences professor leading the experiment, said that the deployment of a solar geoengineering system was “a terrifying prospect” that he hoped would never have to be considered. “At the same time, we should never choose ignorance over knowledge in a situation like this,” he said.

“If you put heat into the stratosphere, it may change how much water gets transported from the troposphere to the stratosphere, and the question is how much are you [creating] a domino effect with all kinds of consequences? What we can do to quantify this is to start with lab studies and try to understand the relevant properties of these aerosols.”

Stratospheric controlled perturbation experiments (SCoPEX) are seen as “critical” to this process and the first is planned to spray water molecules into the stratosphere to create a 1km long and 100m wide icy plume, which can be studied by a manoeuvrable flight balloon.

If lab tests are positive, the experiment would then be replicated with a limestone compound which the researchers believe will neither absorb solar or terrestrial radiation, nor deplete the ozone layer.

Bill Gates and other foundations are substantially funding the project, and aerospace companies are thought to be taking a business interest in the technology’s potential.

The programmme’s launch will follow a major conference involving more than 100 scientists, which begins in Washington DC today.

Solar geoengineering’s journey from the fringes of climate science to its mainstream will be sealed at a prestigious Gordon research conference in July, featuring senior figures from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Oxford University.

Pasztor says that most scientific observers now see the window to a 1.5C warmed world as “practically gone” and notes that atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will continue rising for many decades after the planet has reached a ‘net zero emissions’ point planned for mid-late century.

But critics of solar radiation management approach this as a call to redouble mitigation efforts and guard against the elevation of a questionable Plan B.

“It is appropriate that we spend money on solar geoengineering research,” said Kevin Anderson, the deputy director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. “But we also have to aim for 2C with climate mitigation and act as though geoengineering doesn’t work, because it probably won’t.”

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/techandscience/us-scientists-launch-worlds-biggest-solar-geoengineering-study/ar-BByGDUp?ocid=SK2MDHP

SEE ALSO:

https://thecontrail.com/forum/topics/harvard-scientists-moving-ahead-on-plans-for-atmospheric-geoengin

NASA’s Plan To Make Mars Habitable Again

NASA wants to launch a giant magnetic field to make Mars habitable

So crazy it just might work.

NASA scientists have proposed a bold plan that could give Mars its atmosphere back and make the Red Planet habitable for future generations of human colonists.

 

By launching a giant magnetic shield into space to protect Mars from solar winds, the space agency says we could restore the Red Planet’s atmosphere, and terraform the Martian environment so that liquid water flows on the surface once again.

Mars may seem like a cold, arid wasteland these days, but the Red Planet is thought to have once had a thick atmosphere that could have maintained deep oceans filled with liquid water, and a warmer, potentially habitable climate.

Scientists think Mars lost all of this when its protective magnetic field collapsed billions of years ago, and solar wind – high-energy particles projected from the Sun – has been stripping the Red Planet’s atmosphere away ever since.

Now, new simulations by NASA suggest there could be a way to naturally give Mars its thick atmosphere back – and it doesn’t require nuking the Red Planet into submission, as Elon Musk once proposed.

Instead, the space agency thinks a powerful-enough magnetic shield launched into space could serve as a replacement for Mars’s own lost magnetosphere, giving the planet a chance to naturally restore its own atmosphere.

In new findings presented at the Planetary Science Vision 2050 Workshop last week, NASA’s Planetary Science Division director, Jim Green, said launching an “artificial magnetosphere” into space between Mars and the Sun could hypothetically shield the Red Planet in the extended magnetotail that trails behind the protective field.

“This situation then eliminates many of the solar wind erosion processes that occur with the planet’s ionosphere and upper atmosphere allowing the Martian atmosphere to grow in pressure and temperature over time,” the researchers explain in an accompanying paper.

While the team acknowledges that the concept might sound “fanciful”, they point to existing miniature magnetosphere research being conducted to protect astronauts and spacecraft from cosmic radiation, and think that the same technology on a larger scale could be used to shield Mars.

“It may be feasible that we can get up to these higher field strengths that are necessary to provide that shielding,” Green said in his presentation.

“We need to be able then to also modify that direction of the magnetic field so that it always pushes the solar wind away.”

In the team’s simulations, if the solar wind were counteracted by the magnetic shield, Mars’s atmospheric losses would stop, and the atmosphere would regain as much as half the atmospheric pressure of Earth in a matter of years.

As the atmosphere becomes thicker, the team estimates Mars’s climate would become around 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer, which would be enough to melt carbon dioxide ice over the Red Planet’s northern polar cap.

If this happened, the carbon in the atmosphere would help to trap heat like it does on Earth, triggering a greenhouse effect that could melt Mars’s water ice, giving the Red Planet back its liquid water in the form of flowing rivers and oceans.

If all of this were to occur as the team anticipates – and admittedly, that’s a pretty fantastical if – it’s possible that, within the space of a couple of generations, Mars could regain some of its lost Earth-like habitability.

“This is not terraforming as you may think of it where we actually artificially change the climate, but we let nature do it, and we do that based on the physics we know today,” Green said.

The team acknowledges that the plan is largely hypothetical at this point, but it’s a pretty amazing vision for what might be possible in the years ahead. The researchers intend to keep studying the possibilities to get a more accurate estimate of how long the climate-altering effects would take.

If the concept does prove workable, there’s no telling just how much it would alter the prospects of colonising Mars in the future.

“Much like Earth, an enhanced atmosphere would: allow larger landed mass of equipment to the surface, shield against most cosmic and solar particle radiation, extend the ability for oxygen extraction, and provide ‘open air’ green-houses to exist for plant production, just to name a few,” the researchers explain.

“If this can be achieved in a lifetime, the colonisation of Mars would not be far away.”

The findings were presented at the Planetary Science Vision 2050 Workshop.

By Peter Dockrill / Staff Writer

Peter Dockrill is an award-winning writer and the former Online Editor of APC and TechLife. He’s also the technology columnist for Money magazine.

https://tinyurl.com/z6gfg7y

Via Nexus Newsfeed.

Who Wants To Live Forever?

  • Scientists have discovered a key signalling process in DNA repair
  • They have used this process in the development of a drug to reverse ageing 
  • Trials on mice found that the pill repaired DNA damage after a week
  • Nasa wants the new technology to protect its astronauts from solar radiation 

Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing.

The drug could help damaged DNA to miraculously repair and even protect Nasa astronauts on Mars by protecting them from solar radiation.

A team of researchers developed the drug after discovering a key signalling process in DNA repair and cell ageing.

Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing. A team of researchers developed the drug after discovering a key signalling process in DNA repair and cell ageing

Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing. A team of researchers developed the drug after discovering a key signalling process in DNA repair and cell ageing

THE ANTI-AGEING DRUG TRIALS

The experiments in mice, from a team at the University of New South Wales, suggest a treatment is possible for DNA damage from ageing and radiation.

It is so promising it has attracted the attention of Nasa scientists in their quest to reach Mars.

While our cells can naturally repair DNA damage – such as damage caused by the sun – this ability declines with age.

The scientists identified that the call signalling molecule NAD+, which is naturally present in every cell in the body, has a key role in protein interactions that control DNA repair.

Treating mice with an NAD+ ‘booster’ called NMN improved their cells’ ability to repair DNA damage caused by radiation exposure or old age.

Human trials of NMN therapy will begin within six months.

During trials on mice, the team found that the drug directly repaired DNA damage caused by radiation exposure or old age.

‘The cells of the old mice were indistinguishable from the young mice after just one week of treatment,’ said lead author Professor David Sinclair.

Human trials of the pill will begin within six months.

So since we can’t geoengineer Mars due to the lack of magnetosphere, we need to re-engineer humans for life on Mars? Opens up a whole world of speculation and dot-joining methinks….
…However, maybe NASA has a solution to the magnetosphere issue?
But what effect putting a giant magnet at the Lagrange point? How will this affect Earth?
Anyone have any thoughts on this?

Cellphone Radiation: Sensible Advice

(Natural News) In 2015, New York Times writer Nick Bilton wrote an article entitled “The Health Concerns in Wearable Tech,” warning the public that devices like smartphones and Apple Watches emit a low-level radiation which has been linked to cancer, brain tumors and other problems when worn close to the body for extended periods. His article was based on a press release issued by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in May of 2011, which warned, “The WHO/International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B), based on an increased risk for glioma, a malignant type of brain cancer1, associated with wireless phone use.”

Bilton was not praised for his public health warning; in fact, the mainstream media attacked him, with many calling for his dismissal from the Times.

The truth is, there is ample evidence that radiofrequency electromagnetic fields emitted by cell phones and ot…. This has just been reinforced yet again, in a document released by the California Department of Public Health, entitled simply “Cell Phones and Health.”

The Department has been sitting on the document, which has been revised several times, for the past seven years, refusing to make it public. It was only when Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health, sued the Department last year, and the judge indicated that she would order the release of the document, that the Department made it public.

The document states clearly, “Health officials are concerned about possible health effects from cell phone EMFs because some recent studies suggest that long-term cell phone use may increase the risk of brain cancer and other health problems.” [Emphasis added]

It also notes that studies have found that people diagnosed with certain forms of brain cancer are more likely to have used cellphones in the preceding decade and that the cancers usually occurred on the side of the head that their cellphones were most often used on. It adds, “These studies suggest that regular cell phone use increases the risk of developing some kinds of brain cancer.” (RELATED: Read more about how cell phones are a ticking time-bomb when it comes to cancer here.)

The use of cell phones clearly carries serious health risks, but with modern society so dependent on them, it is unrealistic to think that people will be able to totally end their use. It is, therefore, important to know how to utilize this technology in the safest possible way.

An earlier Natural News article provided several tips on how to protect yourself from cell phone radiation, including:

  1. Reduce the amount of time you spend talking on your cell phone, keeping in mind that every 2-minute phone call disrupts brain activity for up to an hour.
  2. Send text messages rather than making phone calls.
  3. Replace your cell phone with one that emits less radiation. A list of suggestions can be found here.
  4. The jury is still out on whether or not they will really be less damaging in the long-term, but it still might be worth using a headset or speaker rather than talking directly on your cell phone.
  5. Avoid using your cell phone in elevators or other metal enclosures, including your car, as more power is needed to connect the call, emitting more radiation in the process.
  6. A similar problem arises when your cell phone’s battery is low, so charge it before you use it.
  7. If you have to use your phone directly without a headset or speaker, wait until the person you’re calling actually answers before putting it to your ear.

So, the reality is that you probably have to use a cell phone, but by limiting its use and applying the suggestions above, you can try to make the process less damaging to your health.

Follow more news on the health risks of EMFs at EMF.news.

Sources:

SanFrancisco.CBSLocal.com

Drive.Google.com[PDF]

NaturalNews.com

IARC.fr[PDF]

NaturalNews.com
Source

Source:

https://thecontrail.com/group/emf-and-emr-information-and-support/forum/topics/after-years-of-secrecy-cellphone-radiation-risks-are-finally-bein?xg_source=activity

Virtual Warfare 3D: US Navy

Rose Of The Machines

The future is going to be ridiculous.

BEC CREW
27 FEB 2017

Scientists have figured out how to inject a conducting solution into a rose cutting, and have it spontaneously form wires throughout its stem, leaves, and petals to create fully functioning supercapacitors for energy storage.

The so-called e-Plant was able to be charged hundreds of times without any loss on the performance, and the team behind the invention says it could allow us to one day create fuel cells or autonomous energy systems inside living plants.

“A few years ago, we demonstrated that it is possible to create electronic plants, ‘power plants’, but we have now shown that the research has practical applications,” says one of the team, Magnus Berggren from Linköping University in Sweden.

“We have not only shown that energy storage is possible, but also that we can deliver systems with excellent performance.”

Back in 2015, the team produced their first cyborg rose by filling its veins with a conductive polymer solution, and having it weave the material into its living tissue.

As Aviva Rutkin reported for New Scientist at the time, this ended up being a whole lot more difficult than it sounds, because they had to find a material that had decent conductivity, wasn’t toxic to the plant, and didn’t clog or fail to stick to the inner surface of its veins, known as xylem.

They finally found a solution that worked – PEDOT, or poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) – and soaked a regular garden rose cutting in it.

Within just two days, they found that the conducting polymer had been absorbed into its network of veins, and when they removed the outer tissue of the base of the stem, they found actual polymer wires running through the rose’s internet xylem network.

By placing gold electrodes and probes on the ends and in the middle of the rose cutting, the team created a fully functional transistor. They connected it to an external resistor and successfully ran a current through it:

151119-flower-67-edit-1200x800

Berggren described to New Scientist the moment when one of his team, Eleni Stavrinidou, demonstrated the final result.

“When Eleni showed me these beautiful microscope pictures, we understood immediately: we could make circuits out of this,” he said. “The performance, the shape of the wires, were just outstanding, unbelievable.”

Fast-forward to today, and the researchers have taken things one step further.

They’ve managed to tweak the polymer solution so that it spreads autonomously throughout the entire plant – including the leaves and petals – not just localised regions of the stem in the previous experiment.

Not only did the new gel, called ETE-S, disperse throughout the entire vascular tissue of the cutting, but when it solidified into wires, they had two orders of magnitude greater conductivity than those in the previous e-Plants, and retained the high level of conductivity over several centimetres of the plant.

When they peered inside the rose tissue, the researchers found that the polymer solution had permeated its vascular walls to sit between the cell wall and plasma membrane.

This allowed them to turn the network of wires into a fully functioning electronic device by placing several supercapacitors – powerful components used in many different kinds of electronics to store large amounts of electrical energy – along the stem.

For this, the team used the wires as the electrodes, and the plant tissue between them as the electrolyte separator – a permeable membrane that physically separates the electrodes to prevent a short circuit.

They were able to run the e-Plant through repeated charge cycles without losing any efficiency.

“We have been able to charge the rose repeatedly, for hundreds of times without any loss on the performance of the device,” Stavrinidou says in a press statement. 

“The levels of energy storage we have achieved are of the same order of magnitude as those in [traditional] supercapacitors. The plant can, without any form of optimisation of the system, potentially power our ion pump, for example, and various types of sensors.”

The next step for the researchers is to make the technique work in a living rose – not just a cutting – so that the possibility of growing primitive electronic systems inside forest vegetation or fields of vegetables to harvest energy could actually be realised.

It’s a fantastic or dystopian view of the future, depending on how you look at it, but this e-Plant just got us one step closer.

As computer scientist Andrew Adamatzky, who’s been applying voltage to lettuce seedlings at Bristol Robotics Laboratory in the UK, told New Scientist in 2015, “In the very distant future – neither ourselves nor our kids will see this – we can grow vegetable computers in our gardens.”

The research has been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

https://thecontrail.com/forum/topics/cyborg-rose-grows-functioning-electronic-circulatory-inside-its-s