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UK: People to be allowed to pick their own gender without doctor’s diagnosis, under Government plans

UK GENDER LAWS:

From The Independant

The transitioning process will be streamlined to remove bureaucracy
Jon Stone Political Correspondent
@joncstone
The Government is planning to reform gender identity rules to make it easier for people to choose their own gender in law.

UK Gender Laws

Under plans being considered by ministers, adults will be able to change their birth certificates at will without a doctor’s diagnosis, while non-binary gender people will be able to record their gender as “X”.
Changes to the law will be consulted on and will ultimately be included in a planned Gender Recognition Bill, set to be published in the autumn.

Under current laws – established in 2004 – a person who wishes to transition must apply for a Gender Recognition Certificate. This requires a doctor’s diagnosis of gender dysphoria and that someone spend two years of living as a member of the opposite gender.
The reforms were recommended by Parliament’s Women and Equalities Committee last year, which said that they were key to trans people being “treated equally and fairly”.
Plans for self-identification were included in the Labour manifesto, though not the Conservative one. The Gender Recognition Bill did not appear in the Queen’s Speech last month.
Suzanna Hopwood, a member of the Stonewall Trans Advisory Group, said: “It’s vital that this reform removes the requirements for medical evidence and an intrusive interview panel, and finally allows all trans people to have their gender legally recognised through a simple administrative process.”
READ MORE:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/transgender-rules-reform-gender-dysphoria-changes-2004-gender-recognition-self-identify-a7855381.html

Saving Illinois: Getting More Bang for the State’s Bucks

By Ellen Brown

Illinois is teetering on bankruptcy and other states are not far behind, largely due to unfunded pension liabilities; but there are solutions.

The Federal Reserve could do a round of “QE for Munis.” Or the state could turn its sizable pension fund into a self-sustaining public bank.
Illinois is insolvent, unable to pay its bills. According to Moody’s, the state has $15 billion in unpaid bills and $251 billion in unfunded liabilities. Of these, $119 billion are tied to shortfalls in the state’s pension program. On July 6, 2017, for the first time in two years, the state finally passed a budget, after lawmakers overrode the governor’s veto on raising taxes. But they used massive tax hikes to do it — a 32% increase in state income taxes and 33% increase in state corporate taxes — and still Illinois’ new budget generates only $5 billion, not nearly enough to cover its $15 billion deficit.
Adding to its budget woes, the state is being considered by Moody’s for a credit downgrade, which means its borrowing costs could shoot up. Several other states are in nearly as bad shape, with Kentucky, New Jersey, Arizona and Connecticut topping the list. U.S. public pensions are underfunded by at least $1.8 trillion and probably more, according to expert estimates. They are paying out more than they are taking in, and they are falling short on their projected returns. Most funds aim for about a 7.5% return, but they barely made 1.5% last year.
If Illinois were a corporation, it could declare bankruptcy; but states are constitutionally forbidden to take that route. The state could follow the lead of Detroit and cut its public pension funds, but Illinois has a constitutional provision forbidding that as well. It could follow Detroit in privatizing public utilities (notably water), but that would drive consumer utility prices through the roof. And taxes have been raised about as far as the legislature can be pushed to go.
The state cannot meet its budget because the tax base has shrunk. The economy has shrunk and so has the money supply, triggered by the 2008 banking crisis. Jobs were lost, homes were foreclosed on, and businesses and people quit borrowing, either because they were “all borrowed up” and could not go further into debt or, in the case of businesses, because they did not have sufficient customer demand to warrant business expansion. And today, virtually the entire circulating money supply is created when banks make loans When loans are paid down and new loans are not taken out, the money supply shrinks. What to do?
Quantitative Easing for Munis
There is a deep pocket that can fill the hole in the money supply — the Federal Reserve. The Fed had no problem finding the money to bail out the profligate Wall Street banks following the banking crisis, with short-term loans totaling $26 trillion. It also freed up the banks’ balance sheets by buying $1.7 trillion in mortgage-backed securities with its “quantitative easing” tool. The Fed could do something similar for the local governments that were victims of the crisis. One of its dual mandates is to maintain full employment, and we are nowhere near that now, despite some biased figures that omit those who have dropped out of the workforce or have had to take low-paying or part-time jobs.
The case for a “QE-Muni” was made in an October 2012 editorial in The New York Times titled “Getting More Bang for the Fed’s Buck” by Joseph Grundfest et al. The authors said Republicans and Democrats alike have been decrying the failure to stimulate the economy through needed infrastructure improvements, but shrinking tax revenues and limited debt service capacity have tied the hands of state and local governments. They observed:

State and municipal bonds help finance new infrastructure projects like roads and bridges, as well as pay for some government salaries and services.
. . . [E]very Fed dollar spent in the muni market would absorb a larger percentage of outstanding debt and is likely to have a greater effect on reducing the bonds’ interest rates than the same expenditure in the mortgage market.
. . . [L]owering the borrowing costs for states, cities and counties should not only forestall tax increases (which dampen individual spending), but also make it easier for local governments to pay for police officers, firefighters, teachers and infrastructure improvements.rs and infrastructure improvements.

The authors acknowledged that their QE-Muni proposal faced legal hurdles. The Federal Reserve Act prohibits the central bank from purchasing municipal government debt with a maturity of more than six months, and the beneficial effects expected from QE-Muni would require loans of longer duration. But Congress was then trying to avoid the “fiscal cliff,” so all options were on the table. Today the fiscal cliff has come around again, with threats of the debt ceiling dropping on an embattled Congress. It could be time to look at “QE for Munis” again.

Getting More Bang for the Pensioners’ Bucks

Scott Baker, a senior advisor to the Public Banking Institute and economics editor at OpEdNews, has another idea. He argues that the states are far from broke. They may not be able to balance their budgets with taxes, but a search through their Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports (CAFRs) shows that they have massive surplus funds and rainy day funds tucked away around the state, most of them earning minimal returns. (Recall the 1.5% made by the pension funds collectively last year.)
The 2016 CAFR for Illinois shows $94.6 billion in its pension fund alone, and well over $100 billion if other funds are included. To say it is broke is like saying a retired couple with a million dollars in savings is broke because they can earn only 1.5% on their savings and cannot live on $15,000 a year. What they need to do is to spend some of their savings to meet their budget and invest the rest in something safe but more lucrative.
So here is Baker’s idea for Illinois:

Make an iron-clad pledge by law, even in the State Constitution if they can get quick agreement, to provide for pension payouts at the current level and adjusted for inflation in the future.

Liquidate the current pension fund and maybe some of the other liquid funds too to pay off all current debts.

This will leave them with a great credit rating . . . .

Put the remaining tens of billions into a new State Bank, partnering with the beleaguered small and community banks . . . . Use that money to finance state and local businesses and individuals instead of Wall Street schemes and high fund manager fees that will no longer be necessary or advisable, saving the state hundreds of millions a year.
The Public Bank could be built roughly on the model of the hugely successful Bank of North Dakota example, one of the country’s greatest banks, measured by Return on Equity, and scandal-free since its founding in 1919.
The Bank of North Dakota (BND), the nation’s only state-owned bank, has had record profits every year for the last 13 years, with a return on equity in 2016 of 16.6%, twice the national average. Its chief depositor is the state itself, and its mandate is to support the local economy, partnering rather than competing with local banks. Its commercial loans range from 2.4% to 7.5%. The BND makes cheaper loans as well, drawing on loan funds for special programs including infrastructure, startup businesses and affordable housing. Its loan income after deducting allowances for loan losses was $175 million in 2016 on a loan portfolio of $4.7 billion. (2016 BND CAFR, pages 28-29.)That puts the net return on loans at 3.7%.
Illinois could follow North Dakota’s lead. Looking again at the Illinois CAFR (page 45), the amount paid out for pension benefits in 2016 was only $1.833 billion, or less than 2% of the $94.6 billion pool. An Illinois state bank could generate that much in profit, even after paying off the state’s outstanding budget deficit.
Assume Illinois guaranteed its pension payouts, as Baker recommends, then liquidated its pension fund and withdrew $10 billion to meet its current budget shortfall. This would significantly improve its credit rating, allowing it to refinance its long-term debt at a reduced rate. The remaining $85 billion could be put into the state’s own bank, $8 billion as capital and $77 billion as deposits. [See chart below.] At a loan to deposit ratio of 80%, $60 billion could be issued in loans. At a return similar to the BND’s 3.7%, these loans would produce $2.2 billion in interest income. The remaining $17 billion in deposits could be invested in liquid federal securities at 1%, generating an additional $170 million. That would give a net profit of $2.37 billion, enough to cover the $1.8 billion annual pensioners’ payout, with $570 million to spare.
The salubrious result: the pension fund would be self-funding; the state would have a bank that could create credit to support the local economy; the pensioners would have money to spend, increasing demand; the economy would be stimulated, increasing the tax base; and the state would have a good credit rating, allowing it to borrow on the bond market at low interest rates. Better yet, it could borrow from its own bank and pay the interest to itself. The proceeds could then go to its pensioners rather than to bondholders.
Where there is the political will, there is a way. Politicians and central bankers will take radical, game-changing steps in desperate times. We just need to start thinking outside the box, a Wall Street-imposed box that has trapped us in austerity and economic servitude for over a century.

Self-funding of Illinois Pensions
(Image by Ellen Brown)   Permission   Details   DMCA

See Opednews Article for more links and detailed info:

http://Illinois is teetering on bankruptcy and other states are not far behind, largely due to unfunded pension liabilities; but there are solutions.

 

Is This The Future Of Healthcare In America?

Is this really the future of healthcare in America?

The Press25 Jul 2017NICK ALLEN

Future of America?

PHOTOS: REUTERS
People wait to receive medical and dental care at the Remote Area Medical Clinic in Wise, Virginia.
“This organisation was designed to parachute into the most God-awful places. I expected to see stuff like this in South Sudan and Haiti, but it’s right here in the United States of America.” Stan Brock, Remote Area Medical
As Republican politicians in Washington bickered over the fate of ObamaCare, hundreds of desperate people queued outside a county fairground 650km away over the weekend in the hope of receiving basic medical treatment. Teeth rotting, blood pressure soaring, some on crutches or with oxygen tanks, they limped in through the darkness. Some had camped in a field or slept in their cars to be first in line.
This massive free healthcare event, staffed by volunteer doctors and nurses, treated thousands of people over the weekend. Inside a barn, animal stalls were transformed into makeshift medical facilities. A team of optometrists tested for glaucoma in the chicken house. Mammograms and skin examinations took place in articulated lorries.
‘‘I just wish I could get President Trump to come and see this,’’ said Stan Brock, a British philanthropist and founder of Remote Area Medical, the charity behind it. ‘‘The people here are Mr Trump’s constituency, they’re his voters, and it drives me up the wall. If he saw what was happening I’m sure he’d do something about it. Unfortunately I can’t contact him because I don’t tweet.’’ Brock, 80, added: ‘‘This organisation was designed to parachute into the most God-awful places. I expected to see stuff like this in South Sudan and Haiti, but it’s right here in the United States of America.’’
Last week the Republican bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare, a cornerstone pledge of Trump’s campaign, failed in the US Senate.
ObamaCare, the signature domestic policy legacy of his predecessor, led to 20 million more Americans getting health insurance. Repealing it became a cause celebre for Republicans who regard it as costly government overreach, and an unworkable system.
The Senate bill would not only dismantle ObamaCare, it would introduce swingeing US$800 billion cuts over the next decade to Medicaid, the social security healthcare subsidy programme for the unemployed.
As the unfortunate hobbled into the Wise fairground the headline on a morning paper screamed ‘‘32 million more to be uninsured under Republican plan’’. National polls also show ObamaCare is more popular than ever, with a majority of Americans in favour of it for the first time.
But, extraordinarily, many of those in direst need, and who could suffer most under the Trump-backed Senate bill, are still squarely behind the president. The Telegraph interviewed half a dozen Trump voters receiving healthcare at the fairground. Every one said ObamaCare should be repealed, and that they believed Trump would introduce something better.
Their reasons varied. Some had gained coverage under ObamaCare but were unable to meet the rising cost of monthly premiums. Others said they knew little of the detail of the Senate bill, simply pledging faith in Trump.
‘‘I love Trump,’’ said Margaret Harris, 54, shaking her head as she was told Trump backed massive cuts in healthcare spending. She added: ‘‘ObamaCare don’t pay for false teeth and glasses and I blame the Democrats. I’m diabetic and I can’t hardly see you. I need glasses but I ain’t got $400 to pay for them. I know Trump will get it done for us.’’ Similarly, Robert Hicks, 75, a former truck driver who has no insurance, added: ‘‘That’s not Trump, it’s the people in Congress.’’ Hicks, who was having five rotten teeth pulled from his mouth, added: ‘‘I know he’s trying to help us and I’m still with him. We need to vote out the people in Congress who aren’t helping him.’’
Terry Turner, 53, who suffered a broken neck in a factory accident, had much of his care covered by Medicaid, but seemed unconcerned at Trump-backed cuts to the programme.
‘‘I’m all in for Trump, he’s got a good heart,’’ he said, and added that there were ‘‘able-bodied people out there that won’t get out of bed’’ who were abusing Medicaid, who Trump would root out.
Buddy Howington, 48, who was having teeth pulled. His ObamaCare premiums rose to US$2500 a year, and he only earned US$7.25 an hour part-time in a supermarket, so he abandoned coverage. ‘‘Then they fined me $300 for not paying,’’ he said. ‘‘I couldn’t afford to pay for ObamaCare so they fine me. Makes no sense. I don’t know what’s going on in Washington but I think Trump will help eventually.’’ – Telegraph Group

Russia And China Conduct Joint Naval Drill Simulations

Russia China Joint NavalChina, Russia conduct simulation exercise for joint naval drills
IANS|
Updated: Jul 24, 2017, 07.28 AM IST

MOSCOW: Chinese and Russian commanders conducted a simulation exercise in Kaliningrad province for the ongoing joint military drills code-named “Joint Sea 2017” in the Baltic Sea.

In the hours-long exercise on Sunday, two tactical assault groups, consisting of mixed warships from the Chinese and Russian fleets, simulated details of the drills on a map including ship-to-sea firing by secondary cannons, air defense, joint landing and inspection, maritime search and rescue, underway re ..

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/59731044.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Related:

“100k-ton message to the world’: The USS Gerald R. Ford

Glyphosate herbicide and toxic heavy metals act like “binary weapon” to destroy kidneys

https://www.naturalnews.com/051266_glyphosate_heavy_metals_kidney_damage.html

Tuesday, September 22, 2015 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

Glyphosate herbicide(NaturalNews) New research out of Sri Lanka has demonstrated a toxicological aspect of glyphosate that many scientists and laymen alike have overlooked or never even investigated. Besides its inherent toxicity, glyphosate, the primary herbicide chemical used in Monsanto’s Roundup formula, actually makes other toxins and heavy metals more damaging to the body than they otherwise would be on their own.

During the same year that Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena announced a ban on the import and use of glyphosate due to its nephrotoxicity, researchers from Rajarata University and California State University Long Beach determined that glyphosate amplifies the way heavy metals pollute and disrupt normal bodily functions, including the normal function of the kidneys.

C. Jayasumana and his team, who conducted previous research on glyphosate, are trying to get to the bottom of an epidemic of SAN, or Sri Lankan Agricultural Nephropathy, that has been affecting Sri Lankan paddy farmers at an ever-increasing rate since 1994, which is right around the time glyphosate was introduced. Earlier research pegged both arsenic and cadmium exposure as factors in this deadly endemic disease, which manifests as tubulo-interstitial type nephropathy.

For their study, the team collected urine samples from patients with SAN living in the Padavi-Sripura region of the country, one of the locations where SAN rates have reached epic proportions. They then compared these samples to those collected from two sets of control groups, one with healthy participants from the same region, and another with participants living in another part of the country.

After analyzing all the samples for 19 different heavy metals as well as the presence of glyphosate, the team learned that heavy metal contamination was particularly problematic in the endemic region and specifically amplified in those who were also exposed to glyphosate. In other words, participants with glyphosate in their systems also had higher-than-normal levels of heavy metals.

“People in disease endemic areas [are] exposed to multiple heavy metals and glyphosate,” the study reports. “Results are supportive of toxicological origin of SAN that is confined to specific geographical areas … multiple heavy metals and glyphosates may play a role in the pathogenesis.”

“Heavy metals excessively present in the urine samples of patients with SAN are capable of causing damage to kidneys. Synergistic effects of multiple heavy metals and agrochemicals may be nephrotoxic.”

Glyphosate directly associated with kidney damage, as evidenced by higher creatinine levels
Levels of creatinine, the waste product left over from the production and use of creatine in muscle metabolism, were also found to be substantially higher in participants exposed to glyphosate. Creatinine levels in the body generally level out at around two percent under healthy circumstances, but in the participants who were contaminated with glyphosate and heavy metals, creatinine levels were much higher.

Elevated levels of creatinine are indicative of impaired kidney function or kidney disease, which suggests that glyphosate, heavy metals, or more likely a combination of both are causative factors in impaired kidney function and kidney disease, as demonstrated in the study.

“Epidemiological studies have shown a strong association between exposure to heavy metals and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD),” the authors explain in their paper, which was published in the journal BMC Nephrology.

“We measured glyphosate in urine because two authors … have formulated a hypothesis that incriminates glyphosate and heavy metal complexes as a causative factor for SAN.”

Dr. Stephanie Seneff from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has conducted her own research on this subject and reached similar conclusions. Be sure to check out her findings and solutions at the following link.

Sources for this article include:

BioMedCentral.com

GMWatch.org

GMWatch

MedicineNet.com

LewRockwell.com

 

Thanks to Jeff Wefferson for the heads-up and link. Cheers Jeff!

Another Grim Aniversary For Gaza

Another grim anniversary for Gaza
Efforts to end the Gaza blockade must go hand in hand with the wider Palestinian right to self-determination.By
Sharif Nashashibi

Sharif Nashashibi is an award-winning journalist and analyst on Arab affairs.

July 8 marks the anniversary of last year’s Israeli onslaught against Gaza. Commonly and mistakenly described as a war against Hamas, the targets and victims were overwhelmingly civilian (a consistent and deliberate Israeli military strategy). According to the United Nations, two-thirds of the 2,251 Palestinian fatalities were civilian, including 551 children and 299 women.
More than 1,500 children were orphaned. Children and women comprised almost two-thirds of the 11,231 Palestinians injured, 10 percent of whom are permanently disabled. A report by Save The Children on July 6 documented continued “severe emotional distress” among children, including regular bedwetting and nightmares.
Some 19,000 homes were totally or partially destroyed, and 500,000 Palestinians (28 percent of Gaza’s population) were displaced, in what the UN described as “the largest displacement recorded in Gaza since 1967”.

Gaza anniversary

Has Israel committed war crimes in Gaza?
The anniversary of the war will attract predictions about the likelihood or inevitability of the next one. Certainly, for the people of Gaza that prospect is always on the horizon.
Most extremist
Israel’s recently elected government – aptly described as the most extremist in the country’s history (and that is saying something) – consists of figures who believe Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has actually been too soft on Hamas, and want a full-scale invasion and reoccupation of Gaza to wipe out the Palestinian faction.
The terms of last summer’s ceasefire agreement repeat the basic flaws that doomed previous truces: vague wording, and the postponement of talks on the fundamental issues. That means ample time and opportunity for the ceasefire to unravel (Israel has repeatedly violated it).
There is no mention of Egypt or Israel ending their blockades of Gaza, nor of the wider issue of Palestinian statehood. Israel even balks at smaller-scale issues such as constructing a Gaza seaport and rebuilding the airport that was bombed in 2000.
Furthermore, Netanyahu may feel that whenever his popularity is flagging, the remedy is another assault on Gaza. His public approval ratings were sky high during last year’s onslaught, peaking at 82 percent when the ground invasion began.
Gaza’s civilian population has for too long languished in what is aptly described as the world’s largest open-air prison.

So yet another war may be a matter of when, not if, but the next one might not necessarily be with Israel. Last week, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) threatened to “uproot” and “overrun” the “tyrants of Hamas” in Gaza, and to implement sharia law there.
The threat should be taken seriously, given that it follows a string of recent attacks carried out by its sympathisers against Hamas in Gaza – a jihadist challenge to the latter’s authority that would have been unthinkable not long ago. There have reportedly been at least a dozen such attacks so far this year alone, including four in May.

Desperate population

The humanitarian catastrophe that the years-long blockade has caused in Gaza is providing ISIL with fertile ground for recruitment among sections of the impoverished territory’s increasingly desperate population.
“The blockade – now in place for eight years – has devastated Gaza’s economy, left most people unable to leave Gaza, restricted people from essential services such as healthcare and education, and cut Palestinians in Gaza off from those in the West Bank,” said Oxfam on July 3.
According to its report, more than 40 percent of people in Gaza are unemployed, including 67 percent of youth, “the highest rate in the world”. A whopping 80 percent of people are in need of aid, and exports are at less than 3 percent of their pre-blockade levels due to “heavy restrictions” on the transfer of goods.
“Many key industries … have been decimated as essential materials are not allowed” into Gaza, “most of the water supply is unsafe to drink and there are power cuts of 12 hours a day”.

Debate about whether or when conflict will erupt again takes place under the fundamentally flawed premise that war entails simply the resumption of military hostilities. The blockade itself is an act of war, with no end in sight. Focusing only on violence gives the false impression that in its absence there is peace in Gaza, which is occasionally and inexplicably broken by Palestinian militants.
Last summer’s Israeli onslaught did not create a humanitarian disaster – it exacerbated a long-festering one.
“One year on… life for many people in Gaza is getting worse,” said Oxfam, adding that “an already vulnerable civilian population has been left even more vulnerable.”
Not a single home that was totally or partially destroyed has been rebuilt, due to the blockade’s restrictions on building materials.
Moral imperative
A complete lifting of the blockade is a moral imperative, as Gaza’s civilian population has for too long languished in what is aptly described as the world’s largest open-air prison. However, that should be seen as a stepping-stone to realising Palestinian rights and aspirations, not an end-all solution.
The blockade and its duration – even efforts to end it – have created a discourse that views Gaza increasingly as a distinct entity separate from the rest of Palestine and its people. This serves Israel’s divide-and-conquer strategy, which must be resisted.
Efforts to end the blockade must go hand in hand with the wider Palestinian right to self-determination. Palestinians may be geographically and politically divided, but they are one people and one nation.
Even if the blockade were lifted, Gazans would not accept to leave their compatriots to their own fate. Sadly, however, the end of their misery remains a more distant prospect than the resumption of armed conflict, for which there will be more grim anniversaries.
Sharif Nashashibi is an award-winning journalist and analyst on Arab affairs.
The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera’s editorial policy.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2015/07/grim-anniversary-gaza-150708061032649.html

 

NASA has put hundreds of the coolest testing videos you can imagine on YouTube

https://www.dailydot.com/

If you ever wanted to have easy access to watch a jet go Mach 10 or view 1960s film footage of a Lunar Landing Research Vehicle lifting off, NASA has a treat for you.
For the past several days, the space agency’s Armstrong Flight Research Center has posted on YouTube hundreds of unearthed video clips of various flight tests, rocket launches, Mars Rovers, and other just plain cool stuff for anybody who’s fascinated by space and the journey to get there.
The center reportedly selected 500 videos that it would migrate from a little-used corner of the internet on the Dryden Flight Research Center website to YouTube. NASA Armstrong is doing so because it wants fans to have easier access to some of its archived history.
“NASA has so much digital content that tends to be overlooked by the public, given the difficulty that exists in actually locating the content,” Rebecca Richardson, social media manager for NASA Armstrong, told Motherboard. “Our hope is that by moving the content to more accessible platforms, NASA fans and media personnel will be able to access the content more regularly and become more fully immersed in what is happening at NASA.”
Here are some of the coolest videos we found so far.
This is a test flight from the mid-1960s of a Lunar Landing Research Vehicle over California’s Mojave Desert:

 

Video player from: YouTube (Privacy Policy)
This is a 2003 video from the Mojave Desert when researchers were testing the Mars Exploration Rover

Video player from: YouTube (Privacy Policy)

https://youtu.be/nvppLPiYiN0

Here’s a 66-second clip from the mid-1940s that shows the unloading and reassembly of a D-558 Skystreak, a plane that broke a world record four months later by flying at 640.74 mph.

Video player from: YouTube (Privacy Policy)
And finally, if you like explosions, here’s a video montage of a Controlled Impact Demonstration from 1984.

Video player from: YouTube (Privacy Policy)

The post NASA has put hundreds of the coolest testing videos you can imagine on YouTube appeared first on The Daily Dot.

See More:

http://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/techandscience/nasa-has-put-hundreds-of-the-coolest-testing-videos-you-can-imagine-on-youtube/ar-AAoFOAM?li=AAaUOAg&ocid=spartandhp

2030 Agenda: “Identifying” every Person On Earth!

Interesting and perceptive video from Jason A. Elon Musk’s comments are especially noteworthy as the year 2030 looms ever closer. Not so long ago this all seemed like science fiction.