Subscriptions, Current Issue & Back Issues

Shop Website | Annual Subscriptions | Back Issues |

Police to probe UK torture claims. MI5 Officer Accused.

BBC site

Police are to investigate whether an MI5 officer was complicit in the torture of ex-Guantanamo detainee Binyam Mohamed.

The Attorney General, Baroness Scotland QC, said the probe would be “the appropriate course of action”.

Mr Mohamed, 30, a UK resident, said MI5 had prolonged his detention and torture while he was being held in Morocco.

The MI5 agent who questioned him has denied threatening or putting any pressure on Mr Mohamed.

‘Seriousness and sensitivity’

Ethiopian-born Mr Mohamed says he was tortured while in US custody in Pakistan, Morocco and Afghanistan, with the complicity of MI5.

He says that in Morocco in 2002, he was mistreated by local officers who asked him questions supplied by British intelligence. b852

Mr Mohamed returned to the UK in February 2009 after seven years in custody – four of which were spent in the US camp at Guantanamo Bay.

BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner said the investigation would focus on an MI5 officer known as Witness B, who travelled to Karachi in 2002 to question Mr Mohamed.

For the rest of the article, refer the BBC site via the link above.

Related:

See Taxi To The Dark Side, a 2007 Academy Award-nominated documentary film directed by American filmmaker Alex Gibney. The film focuses around the controversial death in custody of an Afghan taxi driver named Dilawar. Dilawar was beaten to death by American soldiers while being held in extrajudicial detention at the Bagram Air Base. Taxi to the Dark Side also goes on to examine America’s policy on torture and interrogation in general, specifically the CIA’s use of torture and their research into sensory deprivation. There is description of the opposition to the use of torture from its political and military opponents, as well as the defence of such methods; the attempts by Congress to uphold the standards of the Geneva Convention forbidding torture; and the popularisation of the use of torture techniques in shows such as 24.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: