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Israeli jets hit ‘chemical weapons site’ in Syria

Syria’s army said Israeli air strikes on Thursday killed two people at a military facility in the country’s west, a zone where the regime has been accused of developing chemical weapons.
The army statement said it took place near the town of Masyaf and warned against the “dangerous repercussions of this aggressive action to the security and stability of the region”.
An Israeli army spokeswoman earlier declined to discuss reports of a strike in Syria, saying the army does not comment on operational matters.
Israeli officials have in the past admitted that Israel has attacked weapons shipments bound for Lebanon’s Iran-backed Hezbollah group, an ally of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, without specifying which ones.
Amos Yadlin, a former head of Israeli military intelligence, tweeted that the reported attack was not routine and targeted a Syrian military scientific centre.

Israeli Jets

© Provided by The Telegraph
Israeli armed forces took part in the largest military drill in 20 years even as reports emerged that a Syrian chemical weapons facility had been attacked.Credit: EPA

“The facility at Masyaf also produces chemical weapons and explosive barrels that have killed thousands of Syrian civilians,” Yadlin said in the tweet.
There was no independent confirmation that this was the target but the United Nations has said in the past that the Syrian government has carried out chemical weapons attacks, which Damascus denies.
Israeli officials have also previously said that Israel and Russia, another Assad ally, maintain regular contacts to coordinate military action in Syria.
Jets flying over Lebanon overnight broke the sound barrier and Lebanese media reported that some Israeli jets had breached Lebanese airspace.

Source:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Will the Federal Government Make It Illegal to Protest Israel?

A new bill with bipartisan support has drawn the ire of the ACLU and others.

A growing number of Republicans and Democrats in Congress are backing a bill that would criminalize support for the international boycott against Israel, also known as the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement.

Boycott Israel Bill

Named the Israel Anti-Boycott Act, the bill so far has garnered support from 29 Republicans and 14 Democrats in the Senate. A similar piece of legislation introduced in the House of Representatives has 237 co-sponsors—63 Democrats and 174 Republicans. With the intent to suppress the BDS movement and others allied with the boycott against Israel, the Israel Anti-Boycott Act imposes harsh punishments: any person guilty of violating the law faces a “minimum civil penalty of $250,000 and a maximum criminal penalty of $1 million and 20 years in prison.”

The Israel Anti-Boycott Act was introduced by Democratic Sen. Benjamin Cardin on March 23 and was drafted with the help of AIPAC, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, according to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. In fact, passage of the bill was listed as one of the group’s top lobbying priorities for 2017.

The bill would build upon two laws, the Export Administration Act of 1979 and the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, the former law making it illegal for U.S. corporations to cooperate with the boycott of Israel. The Office of Anti-Boycott Compliance under the Department of Commerce was created to enforce this very measure.

In addition to its already draconian felony punishments, the law would penalize people for requesting information about boycotts against Israel and would extend the boycott ban into any parts of Israel, including the settlements that were deemed to violate international law by the United Nations. The act would also expand upon the prohibition of partaking in boycotts sponsored by foreign governments to include boycotts from international organizations like the U.N. and the European Union.

On July 17, the American Civil Liberties Union published a letter it sent to all senators urging them to not support the bill on the basis that “it would punish individuals for no reason other than their political beliefs.” While the ACLU clarified that it takes no position on the international boycott of Israel, the statement asserts that, under the First Amendment, the government cannot punish people just because of their “expressed political beliefs.”

The ACLU statement further criticizes the bill for specifically singling out businesses and individuals who do not do any business with Israel for expressed political beliefs.

“There are millions of businesses and individuals who do no business with Israel, or with companies doing business there, for a number of reasons,” the statement reads.

The statement notes that the bill ignores those companies that choose not to do business with Israel purely for pragmatic reasons outside of political belief, instead punishing “businesses and individuals based solely on their point of view.”

This is not the first time lawmakers on both sides of the political spectrum have attempted to infringe on First Amendment rights with the goal of silencing supporters of the BDS movement. Many college students in recent years have faced punishment for expressing support for Palestine and the BDS movement and for pushing their college administrations to cut ties with corporations that conduct business with Israel.

In 2015, members of the Board of Regents who oversee the University of California system—along with support from University president Janet Napolitano—attempted to pass speech codes that would severely crack down on forms of Israel criticism and anti-Israeli activism. Students at any UC campus violating the speech codes would be faced with suspension or even expulsion.

This March, the New York State Senate passed two bills that would strip funding from students and college organizations that participate in “hate speech related to Israel” or partake in boycotts of “Israel and American allied nations.” A third bill passed that same week would prohibit the state from contracting with or investing in businesses that support the BDS movement.

Ironically enough, a number of the bill’s supporters include Democratic lawmakers who have positioned themselves as leaders of the anti-Trump resistance. California Sen. Ted Lieu, who is one of the bill’s co-sponsors, has previously championed the protection of civil liberties and announced he would send monthly donations to the ACLU to resist Trump. New York Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, the latter of whom has been floated as a potential 2020 contender to Trump, have also co-sponsored the bill despite their purported support of civil liberties.

It also seems that a number of Senate Democrats have blindly backed a bill they have little knowledge of, according to inquiries sent to co-sponsors of the bill by the Intercept. When told of the ACLU’s letter, Democratic Sen. Gary Peters of Michigan said, “What’s the Act? You’ll have to get back to me on that.” Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez from New Jersey, considered a reliable congressional ally to AIPAC, told the Intercept, “I’d want to read it….I’d have to look at it.”

With politicians providing lip service to protecting civil liberties and First Amendment rights, it is baffling and alarming that so many of these “free speech advocates” would throw support behind a bill that is not shy about its intent to punish people for their political beliefs.

https://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/will-federal-government-make-it-illegal-protest-israel

Celisa Calacal is a junior writing fellow for AlterNet. She is a senior journalism major and legal studies minor at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York. Previously she worked at ThinkProgress and served as an editor for Ithaca College’s student newspaper. Follow her at @celisa_mia.

Another Grim Aniversary For Gaza

Another grim anniversary for Gaza
Efforts to end the Gaza blockade must go hand in hand with the wider Palestinian right to self-determination.By
Sharif Nashashibi

Sharif Nashashibi is an award-winning journalist and analyst on Arab affairs.

July 8 marks the anniversary of last year’s Israeli onslaught against Gaza. Commonly and mistakenly described as a war against Hamas, the targets and victims were overwhelmingly civilian (a consistent and deliberate Israeli military strategy). According to the United Nations, two-thirds of the 2,251 Palestinian fatalities were civilian, including 551 children and 299 women.
More than 1,500 children were orphaned. Children and women comprised almost two-thirds of the 11,231 Palestinians injured, 10 percent of whom are permanently disabled. A report by Save The Children on July 6 documented continued “severe emotional distress” among children, including regular bedwetting and nightmares.
Some 19,000 homes were totally or partially destroyed, and 500,000 Palestinians (28 percent of Gaza’s population) were displaced, in what the UN described as “the largest displacement recorded in Gaza since 1967”.

Gaza anniversary

Has Israel committed war crimes in Gaza?
The anniversary of the war will attract predictions about the likelihood or inevitability of the next one. Certainly, for the people of Gaza that prospect is always on the horizon.
Most extremist
Israel’s recently elected government – aptly described as the most extremist in the country’s history (and that is saying something) – consists of figures who believe Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has actually been too soft on Hamas, and want a full-scale invasion and reoccupation of Gaza to wipe out the Palestinian faction.
The terms of last summer’s ceasefire agreement repeat the basic flaws that doomed previous truces: vague wording, and the postponement of talks on the fundamental issues. That means ample time and opportunity for the ceasefire to unravel (Israel has repeatedly violated it).
There is no mention of Egypt or Israel ending their blockades of Gaza, nor of the wider issue of Palestinian statehood. Israel even balks at smaller-scale issues such as constructing a Gaza seaport and rebuilding the airport that was bombed in 2000.
Furthermore, Netanyahu may feel that whenever his popularity is flagging, the remedy is another assault on Gaza. His public approval ratings were sky high during last year’s onslaught, peaking at 82 percent when the ground invasion began.
Gaza’s civilian population has for too long languished in what is aptly described as the world’s largest open-air prison.

So yet another war may be a matter of when, not if, but the next one might not necessarily be with Israel. Last week, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) threatened to “uproot” and “overrun” the “tyrants of Hamas” in Gaza, and to implement sharia law there.
The threat should be taken seriously, given that it follows a string of recent attacks carried out by its sympathisers against Hamas in Gaza – a jihadist challenge to the latter’s authority that would have been unthinkable not long ago. There have reportedly been at least a dozen such attacks so far this year alone, including four in May.

Desperate population

The humanitarian catastrophe that the years-long blockade has caused in Gaza is providing ISIL with fertile ground for recruitment among sections of the impoverished territory’s increasingly desperate population.
“The blockade – now in place for eight years – has devastated Gaza’s economy, left most people unable to leave Gaza, restricted people from essential services such as healthcare and education, and cut Palestinians in Gaza off from those in the West Bank,” said Oxfam on July 3.
According to its report, more than 40 percent of people in Gaza are unemployed, including 67 percent of youth, “the highest rate in the world”. A whopping 80 percent of people are in need of aid, and exports are at less than 3 percent of their pre-blockade levels due to “heavy restrictions” on the transfer of goods.
“Many key industries … have been decimated as essential materials are not allowed” into Gaza, “most of the water supply is unsafe to drink and there are power cuts of 12 hours a day”.

Debate about whether or when conflict will erupt again takes place under the fundamentally flawed premise that war entails simply the resumption of military hostilities. The blockade itself is an act of war, with no end in sight. Focusing only on violence gives the false impression that in its absence there is peace in Gaza, which is occasionally and inexplicably broken by Palestinian militants.
Last summer’s Israeli onslaught did not create a humanitarian disaster – it exacerbated a long-festering one.
“One year on… life for many people in Gaza is getting worse,” said Oxfam, adding that “an already vulnerable civilian population has been left even more vulnerable.”
Not a single home that was totally or partially destroyed has been rebuilt, due to the blockade’s restrictions on building materials.
Moral imperative
A complete lifting of the blockade is a moral imperative, as Gaza’s civilian population has for too long languished in what is aptly described as the world’s largest open-air prison. However, that should be seen as a stepping-stone to realising Palestinian rights and aspirations, not an end-all solution.
The blockade and its duration – even efforts to end it – have created a discourse that views Gaza increasingly as a distinct entity separate from the rest of Palestine and its people. This serves Israel’s divide-and-conquer strategy, which must be resisted.
Efforts to end the blockade must go hand in hand with the wider Palestinian right to self-determination. Palestinians may be geographically and politically divided, but they are one people and one nation.
Even if the blockade were lifted, Gazans would not accept to leave their compatriots to their own fate. Sadly, however, the end of their misery remains a more distant prospect than the resumption of armed conflict, for which there will be more grim anniversaries.
Sharif Nashashibi is an award-winning journalist and analyst on Arab affairs.
The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera’s editorial policy.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2015/07/grim-anniversary-gaza-150708061032649.html

 

Narendra Modi in Israel: Don’t believe the hype, India isn’t abandoning support for Palestine

It seems only fair that the first Indian prime minister to visit Israel is Narendra Modi of the BJP.

Benjamin Netanyahu and Narendra Modi at Tel Aviv airport on Tuesday. PTI

Benjamin Netanyahu and Narendra Modi at Tel Aviv airport on Tuesday. PTI

The party had, even when it was in the Opposition, advocated closer ties to Israel, a nation much admired by the BJP and the Sangh Parivar for its aggressive defence capabilities and disproportionate retaliation for every missile launched from Palestinian soil.

In the hubbub surrounding Modi’s visit, former prime minister PV Narasimha Rao is almost forgotten. It was Rao, ever the pragmatist, who decided to improve relations with with Israel in 1992, at the end of the Cold War.

So he should be given some credit, especially as the Congress party since Independence had been a forceful advocate of Palestinian rights and Rao’s decision would have shocked several party stalwarts.

Israel prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is going all out to make Modi’s visit — to mark 25 years of diplomatic ties — a memorable one. He will receive Modi at the airport, which he has done only for US president Donald Trump. Remember, the US is Israel’s closest ally.  Netanyahu will also accompany Modi everywhere during the trip.

In fact, there has been so much focus on the Modi visit, that Israel’s well respected newspaper Haaretz, wondered if India was to replace the US as Tel Aviv’s major ally: “Judging by the multiple ‘promo’ articles in the Indian and Israel press pre-announcing the visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Israel in July 2017, India could be Israel’s greatest ally. Uncertain of President Trump’s stand on several key issues, will ‘redemption’ come to Jerusalem via New Delhi?”

And the same piece goes on to say: “Indeed, the stakes are high. Israel has already signed on its largest deal in history: a $2 billion defense agreement (reportedly, $1.6 billion for Israel Aerospace Industries and $0.4 billion for Rafael, a a state-owned defense company) by which India will purchase anti-missile systems and
components made in Israel.’’

Yet despite the friendship and the hype around it, Modi will need to balance relations with Israel with that of other Gulf countries. The tight rope walk that India has always done since 1992, will continue to be Delhi’s focus. Modi knows that well and has drawn red lines.

In interviews ahead of the visit, the prime minister made it clear that on certain issues, he would not completely break from the past. When asked if India would shift its embassy to Jerusalem by an Israeli newspaper that was pro-government, unlike Trump, who promised he would do so during the election, Modi gave a categorical no.

Modi also stuck to Delhi’s line on the Palestinian issue: “India believes in a two-state solution in which both Israel and a future Palestinian state coexist peacefully,” he said on Monday.

He went on to say: “A final-status agreement should respect the sentiments and address demands of all affected parties,” he added. So despite India’s close ties with Israel, it is not as if Delhi is going to ignore Palestine or the Gulf countries.

There has been much talk about breaking with convention and making the trip to Israel a stand-alone visit. It had been mandatory for all Indian leaders to visit both Israel and Palestine. President Pranab Mukherjee as well as Vice-President Hamid Ansari had done so.

While Modi is not visiting Palestine, India had invited President Mahmoud Abbas to Delhi in May and again reiterated Delhi’s support for a Palestinian state. Despite Modi’s desire to expand ties with Israel and upgrade it to perhaps a strategic partnership, Modi has not neglected the Gulf nations. He has invested both time and effort and established a rapport with the ruling families of Saudi Arabi, Qatar, and UAE and has visited each of these countries.

Considering over seven million Indians live and work out of the region and send back remittances fluctuating between $35 and $4o billion annually, the Arab states cannot be ignored.

The bulk of India’s oil supplies and 80 percent of its natural gas is imported from the region. So Modi knows that he cannot tilt completely towards Israel without offending key Arab leaders. Though the Arab states have paid mere lip service to the Palestinian cause in the last two decades, a complete change of India’s policy towards Palestine will not go down well in the region. It will be interpreted as part of the the BJP government’s anti-Muslim stand.

Leaders of the region are also aware that Kashmir, India’s only Muslim majority state, is on the boil as street protests take on the BJP-PDP government in Srinagar. Despite the violence and the crackdown by the authorities in Kashmir, the Gulf leaders, have not so far made many statements on the situation in Kashmir.

In the early days, there would have been an outpouring of concern from every Arab capital on the Valley. More significant has been the cooperation of both Saudi Arabia and the UAE in getting terror suspects back from these countries.

Published Date: Jul 05, 2017 06:46 am | Updated Date: Jul 05, 2017 06:46 am

Water: India is desperately short of it, and Israel is a leader in desalination and irrigation tech. Might be a key ingredient in this scenario?

Jared Kushner: Man On A Middle-Eastern Mission

 Jared Kushner: The young, well spoken, impeccably groomed son-in-law seems to be unstoppable in his rise to prominence. I mark him as a man to watch very closely. There is certain to be speculation and controversy galore with this man!
FROM REUTERS:
By Luke Baker | JERUSALEM

JERUSALEM U.S. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, met Israeli and Palestinian leaders on Wednesday to try to revive long-fractured Middle East peacemaking that Washington acknowledged will take some time.

Kushner, a 36-year-old real estate developer with little experience of international diplomacy or political negotiation, arrived in Israel on Wednesday morning and was due to spend barely 20 hours on the ground.

Video showed him giving Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a friend of Kushner’s father, a handshake and a hug as they prepared to sit down with the Israeli ambassador to Washington, the U.S. ambassador to Israel and other senior officials for preliminary discussions.

“This is an opportunity to pursue our common goals of security, prosperity and peace,” Netanyahu said. “Jared, I welcome you here in that spirit. I know of your efforts, the president’s efforts, and I look forward to working with you to achieve these common goals.”

Kushner replied: “The president sends his best regards and it’s an honor to be here with you.”

Kushner did not speak to the media or take questions, maintaining the circumspect profile he has established since Trump took office in January.

U.S. officials and Israeli leaders “underscored that forging peace will take time and stressed the importance of doing everything possible to create an environment conducive to peacemaking,” the White House later said in a statement.

Kushner traveled to Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, for two hours of talks with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas after iftar, the evening meal that breaks the daily Ramadan fast.

Abbas spokesman Nabil Abu Rdainah said all major issues at the heart of the conflict were discussed.

U.S. officials called the trip part of an effort to keep the conversation going rather than the launching of a new phase in the peace process, saying that Kushner and Jason Greenblatt, the president’s special representative for international negotiations, are likely to return often.

Trump has described peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians as “the ultimate deal” and made it a priority. As well as receiving both Netanyahu and Abbas in the White House, he visited the region last month.

But it remains unclear what approach Trump, via Kushner and Greenblatt, plans to take on resolving one of the world’s most intractable conflicts.

For at least two decades, the goal of U.S.-led diplomacy has been a “two-state solution”, meaning an independent Palestinian state living side-by-side and at peace with Israel.

But when Trump met Netanyahu in Washington in February, he said he was not fixed on two states saying, “I’m looking at two-state and one-state, and I like the one that both parties like”.

12 ‘BULLET POINTS’

Netanyahu has in the past given conditional backing to two states. But ahead of his last election victory in 2015, he promised there would never be a Palestinian state on his watch, a remark seen as an attempt to shore up right-wing support.

In discussions with Greenblatt before Kushner’s visit, Palestinian sources said the phrase “two-state solution” had not been used.

Palestinian sources said that ahead of Kushner’s meeting with Abbas, they had been asked to draw up a list of 12 “bullet point” demands they would want met in any negotiations.

They saw it as a helpful exercise in focusing on core elements rather than an oversimplification of a complex issue.

Trump administration officials have said that if they are going to make progress on peace, they do not want to get bogged down in process but to move rapidly on tackling what are known as “final status” issues, the complexities around Jerusalem, Palestinian refugees, water resources, security and borders.

Those have long been thorny problems in the multiple rounds of peace negotiations launched by both Republican and Democratic presidents since the mid-1990s. It remains unclear what new approach Trump’s administration may have to untangling disputes that blend politics, land, religion and ethnicity and have defied resolution for 70 years.

(Additional reporting by Jeffrey Heller and Ali Sawafta; Editing by Howard Goller)

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-israel-palestinians-usa-talks-idUSKBN19C162

AND FOR A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE:

Even before Benjamin Netanyahu locked him in a warm embrace, Jared Kushner began his effort to broker peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians by making it clear that he completely accepts Israel’s vision of itself as an innocent victim.

That’s because Kushner started his 15-hour trip to the Middle East on Wednesday by mourning with the family of an Israeli police officer, Hadas Malka, who was killed by a Palestinian assailant in East Jerusalem on Friday.

Since her death, Israelis have been outraged over the murder of Malka, who was a member of the border police force charged with maintaining Israeli control in the Old City of Jerusalem, one of the Palestinian territories occupied by Israel since 1967.

Read more:

https://theintercept.com/2017/06/21/jared-kushners-pursuit-middle-east-peace-looks-lot-like-total-surrender-israel/

See also:

Jared Kushner: “There Is Something Very Strange About This Man”: Video

U.S. tells UN rights forum to remove ‘chronic anti-Israel bias’

Image result for UN slams US Israel bias

By Stephanie Nebehay | GENEVA

GENEVA The Trump administration gave formal notice on Tuesday that it is reviewing its participation in the U.N. Human Rights Council and called for reforming the body to eliminate what it called its “chronic anti-Israel bias”.

“The United States is looking carefully at this Council and our participation in it. We see some areas for significant strengthening,” Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told the Geneva forum, opening a three-week session.

The Council’s critical stance of Israel has long been a contentious issue for the United States, Israel’s main ally.

The body has taken a strong position against Israel’s occupation of territory seized in the 1967 Middle East war, its treatment of Palestinians, and its building of Jewish settlements. Most countries consider the settlements, in areas the Palestinians envisage as part of an eventual independent state, illegal.

Washington says the Council is stacked with opponents of Israel and boycotted it for three years under President George W. Bush before rejoining under Barack Obama in 2009.

“Tragically, we’ve been down this road before, Haley later told the Graduate Institute of Geneva. “America does not seek to leave the Human Rights Council. We seek to reestablish the Council’s legitimacy.”

She named Venezuela, Cuba, China, Burundi, and Saudi Arabia as not upholding the highest standards despite their membership and said that the forum was becoming “discredited” like its predecessor body, the Human Rights Commission.

The 47-member Council adopted five “biased” resolutions on Israel and the Palestinian territory at its March session, but never even considered a resolution on Venezuela, she said.

“This relentless, pathological campaign against a country that actually has a strong human rights record makes a mockery not of Israel, but of the Council itself,” Haley said, as some in the audience interrupted briefly with laughter at the remark.

She called for the Council to address serious human rights violations in Venezuela and for the government of President Nicolas Maduro to address them.

“If Venezuela cannot, it should voluntarily step down from its seat on the Human Rights Council until it can get its own house in order. Being a member of this council is a privilege, and no country who is a human rights violator should be allowed a seat at the table,” she said.

Haley called for the council to adopt strong resolutions on abuses in Syria, Eritrea, Belarus, Ukraine and the Democratic Republic of Congo at its session.

Some activists urged Washington to focus on abuses at home.

“It’s hard to take Ambassador Haley seriously on U.S. support for human rights in light of Trump administration actions like the Muslim ban and immigration crackdowns,” Jamil Dakwar, director of the human rights program at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), told Reuters.

“The United States must get its own house in order and make human rights at home a priority – then, it can begin to credibly demand the same of other countries abroad.”

(additional reporting by Tom Miles, Editing by Angus MacSwan)

https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-usa-un-rights-idUKKBN18X16W

Hmmmm….truth? Bias?

An 87-year-old German woman has been sentenced to ten months in prison for doubting that people were “exterminated” by being gassed in the Nazi concentration camp in Auschwitz.

Ursula Haverbeck

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An 87-year-old German woman has been sentenced to ten months in prison for doubting that people were “exterminated” by being gassed in the Nazi concentration camp in Auschwitz.

Ursula Haverbeck was sentenced at the Hamburg District Court on Nov. 11, 2015.

Arriving without a lawyer, Haverbeck defended herself and reiterated her doubts about the official holocaust story in the courtroom

Revisionistreview reports:

She was accused of giving an interview to the German magazine Panorama in which she stated that Auschwitz was not an extermination camp but a labor camp. The mass murder of Jews had not taken place, she said.

Haverbeck, former chairwoman of the now-banned freethought association, “Collegium Humanum,” told the judge,”Here, I stand.”

Turning to the prosecutor she asked, “How do you as a lawyer prove the accusation that Auschwitz was an extermination camp?” Her request for a revisionist historian to give evidence that at Auschwitz no one had been gassed, was rejected by Judge Jönsson who stated: “It is futile to argue with people who do not accept the facts.”

The German government prosecutor maintained that the defendant’s “fanatical delusion” had not abated and that, despite her advanced age, Ursula Haverbeck must be sentenced to 10 months in prison without parole. The judge agreed and the sentence was imposed.

In 2009, Haverbeck was fined thousands of dollars in the District Court of Bad Oeynhausen, for having given offense to Charlotte Knobloch, president of the Central Council of Jews.

https://thecontrail.com/profiles/blogs/87-yr-old-german-woman-imprisoned-for-doubting-auschwitz-claims?xg_source=activity

Amazon Bans, Shreds, And Burns Thousands of Books: “Holocaust Denial”.

Hundreds of important books on the Holocaust by revisionist scholars have suddenly been banned by Amazon on instructions from angry rabbis in Israel (see video at the end of this article) and from Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem. 

Even books not directly relating to the Holocaust, but pertaining to Jewish affairs during WWII, have been included in the mass ban. Revisionist scholar Germar Rudolf has given a complete list of these books (see below) and it’s highly likely more volumes will be added to this growing list of “forbidden books” in the days ahead.

Meanwhile, in an apparent attempt to muddy the waters, The Times of Israel published an article a few days ago in which it stated that only three books have been banned by Amazon in the UK — without referring to Amazon in the US or the long list of banned books mentioned by Germar Rudolf on CODOH. (See Amazon Mass-bans Dissident Materials, Hundreds of Titles Erased within a Day)

A reliable source informs me that several thousand volumes have been shredded or put through incinerators at Amazon, but this is hard to verify. This has to be one of the greatest acts of cultural vandalism perpetrated within recent times. In characteristic Orwellian fashion, many historical facts are being “flushed down the memory hole” and false factoids put in their place — like the fairy tales spun by Elie Wiesel, e.g., Jewish blood gushing from the ground in geysers (picture).

The Cultural Vandals dare not debate these matters in public, preferring the Stalinesque weapons of censorship and intimidation, followed in many cases by fines and imprisonment.

—  §  —

Only a few months ago, I was lucky enough to buy from Amazon a copy of M.S. King’s The Bad War: The Truth Never Taught About World War 2. Mike King is the owner of the Tomato Bubble website. His lavishly illustrated  246-page book sits on my bedside table. I am one of the lucky ones who bought the book just in time. Because it has now been banned by Amazon.

Apparently Mike received a frosty note from Amazon the other day informing him that his book was no longer fit for human consumption. “We’re contacting you,” the email told him coldly, “regarding the following book: The Bad War: The Truth NEVER Taught About World War II. During our review process, we found that this content is in violation of our content guidelines. As a result, we cannot offer this book for sale.”

What exactly are these mysterious “guidelines”? Amazon refuses to give details. Apparently the head honchos at Amazon don’t like Mike’s ideas. For example, in writing about World War Two, Mike expresses a sneaking sympathy for the German side, hinting it might have been better all round if the Germans had won the war. Mike mixes up the good guys with the bad guys. Let’s face it, that’s not acceptable.

It’s also possible that Mike, at some time or other, had expressed doubts that six million Jews had died in gas chambers during the Holocaust. That was a big mistake. In fact, it’s the biggest mistake anyone can make nowadays. It can get you slung into prison in at least sixteen countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, and Switzerland. Mike’s shockingly incorrect views on the Holocaust obviously jangled a few nerves at Amazon and consequently violated their “guidelines”. So Mike had to go.

And so Mike’s book was banned.

—  §  —

Before I go any further, a few words on Amazon would perhaps be in order.

Amazon is now the largest internet retailer in the world, valued at $240 billion. It is owned by Jeff Bezos, worth $45.2 billion. Jeff happens to be the fifth richest billionaire in the world, the first four being Bill Gates ($75 billion), Amancio Ortega ($67 billion), Warren Buffett ($60.8 billion), and  Carlos Slim Helu ($50 billion).

Is Jeff Bezos a Jew? I don’t think so, though he has “crypto-Jew status” among the more wild-eyed conspiracy theorists who people the internet. It’s possible that many of Jeff’s closest associates are Jewish, however, such as Tom Alberg, Jon Rubenstein and David Zapolsky.

It’s obviously relevant to enquire into Amazon’s Jewish connections, since there is more than enough evidence to support the view that Jewish rabbis have had an enormous input in dictating Amazon’s famous “guidelines” (see video below). While investigating Amazon’s possible Jewish links, I was amused to find myself on a website that gave a link to an article called “Is Jeff Bezos Evil?” I decided to click on this to find out, but lost interest once I was told I had to log in and give my password. So the question of whether Jeff is evil or not remains unanswered.

A few further clicks, however, provided me with some clues as to whether Jeff was “evil” or not. It tuns out that Jeff is the ultimate ruthless capitalist who exploits his  workers to the bone, getting the last drop of blood out of them — like a vampire running amok in a blood storage factory. He has 180,000 employees working for him full time, and 380,000 people working for him part time in various foreign countries, and boy! he really does drive them like a slavemaster! If “ruthless capitalist vampiric slavemaster” equates to evil, then I guess the word “evil” has to apply to Jeff Bezos.

JEFF BEZOS, OWNER OF AMAZON.COM

Does this man look Evil? YOU decide!

Here’s what the Daily Mail has to say about working conditions at Amazon. An undercover reporter for the newspaper managed to infiltrate the company by getting a job there, and seeing what it was like working 12-hour shifts for a company on the minimum wage.

— Amazombies: Seven seconds to find an item, every move filmed and blistering 12-hours shifts with timed toilet breaks.

— Workers faced relentless time targets for every task they were given.  Staff had to work ‘compulsory’ extra days and hours and were given short notice of shift changes. There was an atmosphere of mistrust and suspicion, with handheld scanners tracking workers’ whereabouts, plus CCTV cameras monitoring the warehouse, and airport-style security checks.

— Staff were left with blistered feet after walking up to 14 miles a day. One employee said: “You just leave your brains behind when you start working here. You’re just a zombie. On our induction day, training staff told us we could expect to walk ten to 14 miles a day [collecting items from distant shelves]. By comparison, Royal Mail postmen normally walk no more than eight miles a day.

EXPANDED PICTURE OF AMAZON WAREHOUSE

— The most common complaint among staff on the warehouse floor was about their sore feet. One told us: “I have such bad blisters on my feet. I am so exhausted. I never knew it would be this tough. My boots are falling apart, and it’s only been four days.”

— Staff are also disciplined for taking too long to walk back from breaks and time spent in the bathroom. One employee explained how he was given a warning in his second week for taking seven minutes during an unscheduled break to go to the bathroom. (See here)

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According to Kevin Barrett, the best book he has read on the Holocaust is Thomas Dalton’s Debating the Holocaust: A New Look at Both Sides. Barrett writes:

“The book is thorough, precise, well-documented, and lays out a convincing prima facie case that holocaust revisionism needs to be taken seriously. Scholarly, dispassionate, and utterly lacking in anything that could remotely be called “hate” or bigotry, Debating the Holocaust is no longer available on Amazon. And that is an outrage.”

To my regret, this is one book I don’t own. And now it’s too late to buy it from Amazon. Barrett goes on to name other books Amazon has tossed on the bonfire. Nick Kollerstrom’s Breaking the Spell is one of them.

With academic qualifications in Chemistry and a doctorate in the philosophy and history of science, Dr Kollerstrom had been under the impression that he was qualified to say something about Zyklon B, the gas allegedly utilized to kill Jews in gas chambers. The results of Kollerstrom’s painstaking research into Nazi “death camps” were set out in his controversial book Breaking the Spell. In this he reached conclusions which were obviously in conflict with the unstated “guidelines” set by his employer, University College, London.

Dr Kollerstrom had discovered that Zyklon B gas, purportedly used to exterminate Jews in large quantities, was actually used to kill lice in order to prevent Jews (and others in the camps) from dying of typhus. Zyklon B was a pesticide, not a murder weapon for thinning Jewish world population. Such a view, of course, could not be tolerated by Dr Kollerstrom’s prestigious university, especially by its Jewish staff. So Dr Kollerstrom was given the chop. Sacked by his college and then given the cold shoulder by Amazon.

Another revisionist scholar who has been affected by the ban on Holocaust revisionism is Dr. Robert Faurisson. We learn from Kevin Barrett:

Faurisson is wildly popular in Morocco, where his books were recommended to me by academic colleagues there during my year of Fulbright-sponsored Ph.D. research in 1999-2000.

Has Faurisson’s Amazon catalogue been tampered with? I can’t tell; but there certainly is a shocking paucity of affordable Faurisson offerings there. The bulk of his work is “currently unavailable.

ROBERT FAURISSON, FRENCH REVISIONIST,
his face badly disfigured by three Jewish thugs 

You will find full details of this savage attack on the CODOH site. Similar facial disfigurement of political dissidents who dare to question the Jewish version of the Holocaust has been promised by the same Jewish organization that carried out the attack on Faurisson. “Faurisson is the first, but will not be the last,” they threatened.

Dr. Robert Faurisson, was severely injured in a nearly fatal attack on September 16, 1989. After spraying a stinging gas into his face, temporarily blinding him, three assailants punched Dr. Faurisson to the ground and then repeatedly kicked him in the face and chest. “He was conscious, but he couldn’t speak,” said a fire fighter who gave Faurisson first aid. “His jaw was smashed. They destroyed his face.”

The 60-year-old scholar, who had been out walking his poodle in a park in his home town of Vichy, suffered a broken jaw and severe head injuries. Physicians operated for four and a half hours to repair his jaw and treat a broken rib and badly swollen face.

A group calling itself, “The Sons of the Memory of the Jews” claimed responsibility for the savage attack. In a statement, the group threatened: “Professor Faurisson is the first, but will not be the last. Let those who deny the Shoah [Holocaust] beware.” 

Another casualty of this Jewish witch hunt is Germar Rudolf.

Like Faurisson, Rudolf too has paid dearly for discovering unpalatable truths and transmitting them to others via the printed word. He has been thrown into prison. His books and papers have been stolen. His savings have also been plundered.

As you might expect, Germar Rudolf has been another victim of Amazon’s witch hunt. He is now too dangerous to be read. It would be highly toxic if thousands, if not millions of people, should begin to suspect that they had been bamboozled by the Holocaust merchants. That they had been the victims of a well-organized hoax.

Kevin Barret publishes a letter written to him by Germar Rudolf which I should now like to quote in full. It’s an important letter because it not only reveals the huge extent of Amazon’s censorship but also of Amazon’s complete capitulation to Jewish demands. If entire governments — like that of the United States, Britain, France and Germany — can fall so easily under the Jewish heel and take orders from the likes of the Rothschilds and the Soroses, what hope is there for mere international corporations like Amazon?

READ THE REST INCLUDING LETTER. EXTENSIVE LIST AND LINKS HERE:

Amazon Bans ‘Holocaust Denial’, shreds and incinerates thousands of books

Regardless of one’s personal beliefs on this or any other subject, surely one has the right to research the facts and decide for oneself?

How many more book burnings does history have to suffer?